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Leading schools with borrowed practice?

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Abstract:

Liberating education requires commitment to developing student agency and often includes the transformation of education systems. Central to systemic change, but often overlooked in comparative and international education research, is school leadership and governance. This may be because despite evidence indicating that leadership effectiveness impacts student achievement, school culture, and school improvement (Tyack & Cuban, 1997; Fullan, 2007; Elmore, 2004), discreet preparation for the role of school leader has not been required or even formed in most education systems worldwide. Role differentiation from teaching is lacking, and school leader responsibilities are often unclear. Interestingly however, formalized educational leadership is currently proliferating across socioeconomically, politically, and culturally diverse country contexts in rapid and strikingly similar ways. The purpose of this study is to trace this global spread of leadership policy and practice in three countries: United States, Switzerland, and Azerbaijan. The study documents leadership policy convergence against a globalization policyscape (Carney, 2009) featuring increasing demands for accountability, efficiency, transparency, and autonomy in the education sector. Accordingly, the overarching research question explored in this study is: For what reasons and in what ways have educational leadership policy and practice developed in each country context?

In this study, Ochs and Phillips’ (2004) four-stage policy borrowing framework was applied (cross-national attraction, decision-making, implementation, and internalization) after qualitative data (interviews, observations, and document review) was collected in the three countries using case study methodology. Preliminary findings include: non-linearity of stages, diverse “push factors,” both convergence and divergence under globalization, similar challenges and experiences with change, school leadership as new profession, popularity of distributed leadership vs. obscurity of instructional leadership, and strong and nearly singular reliance on Anglo-American leadership literature.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493947_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Magno, Cathryn. "Leading schools with borrowed practice?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493947_index.html>

APA Citation:

Magno, C. , 2011-05-01 "Leading schools with borrowed practice?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493947_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Liberating education requires commitment to developing student agency and often includes the transformation of education systems. Central to systemic change, but often overlooked in comparative and international education research, is school leadership and governance. This may be because despite evidence indicating that leadership effectiveness impacts student achievement, school culture, and school improvement (Tyack & Cuban, 1997; Fullan, 2007; Elmore, 2004), discreet preparation for the role of school leader has not been required or even formed in most education systems worldwide. Role differentiation from teaching is lacking, and school leader responsibilities are often unclear. Interestingly however, formalized educational leadership is currently proliferating across socioeconomically, politically, and culturally diverse country contexts in rapid and strikingly similar ways. The purpose of this study is to trace this global spread of leadership policy and practice in three countries: United States, Switzerland, and Azerbaijan. The study documents leadership policy convergence against a globalization policyscape (Carney, 2009) featuring increasing demands for accountability, efficiency, transparency, and autonomy in the education sector. Accordingly, the overarching research question explored in this study is: For what reasons and in what ways have educational leadership policy and practice developed in each country context?

In this study, Ochs and Phillips’ (2004) four-stage policy borrowing framework was applied (cross-national attraction, decision-making, implementation, and internalization) after qualitative data (interviews, observations, and document review) was collected in the three countries using case study methodology. Preliminary findings include: non-linearity of stages, diverse “push factors,” both convergence and divergence under globalization, similar challenges and experiences with change, school leadership as new profession, popularity of distributed leadership vs. obscurity of instructional leadership, and strong and nearly singular reliance on Anglo-American leadership literature.


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