Citation

TABLE 4. Parentified children in the US: A study of Korean temporary migrant youths' cultural identities

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Abstract:

This study examines how parentification influences Korean temporary migrant youth in the U.S. to negotiate their cultural identity. Parentification is defined as "the familial interactional pattern in which children and adolescents are assigned or assume roles and responsibilities normally the province of adults in given culture, but which parents in a particular family have abdicated " (Walsh et al., 2006, p. 321). Recently significant member of Korean secondary students come to study abroad in the U.S. by the influences of "the Globalization Era" because Korean parents wished to send their children to the U.S. to have their children learn English and gain better education. Many of these students come with their mothers, because fathers need to stay in Korea to support the rest of the familiy in the U.S. After these students come to the U.S, they face many difficulties such as language barriers and cultural differences. As times goes by, the students face another challenge to acculturate into new environments because they need to take parentals roles. Since children generally adapt to a new culture faster than their mothers do, the children need to be a cultural bridge for their mothers. Thus, this study investigates how parentification influences these student’s cultural identity negotiation. To explore this issue, this study used qualitative methodology by ethnographical approach with the students and mothers from a city in the southeastern U.S. The data were collected from deep interviews, observation, and research diaries.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493949_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Park, Youngwoo. "TABLE 4. Parentified children in the US: A study of Korean temporary migrant youths' cultural identities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493949_index.html>

APA Citation:

Park, Y. , 2011-04-30 "TABLE 4. Parentified children in the US: A study of Korean temporary migrant youths' cultural identities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493949_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines how parentification influences Korean temporary migrant youth in the U.S. to negotiate their cultural identity. Parentification is defined as "the familial interactional pattern in which children and adolescents are assigned or assume roles and responsibilities normally the province of adults in given culture, but which parents in a particular family have abdicated " (Walsh et al., 2006, p. 321). Recently significant member of Korean secondary students come to study abroad in the U.S. by the influences of "the Globalization Era" because Korean parents wished to send their children to the U.S. to have their children learn English and gain better education. Many of these students come with their mothers, because fathers need to stay in Korea to support the rest of the familiy in the U.S. After these students come to the U.S, they face many difficulties such as language barriers and cultural differences. As times goes by, the students face another challenge to acculturate into new environments because they need to take parentals roles. Since children generally adapt to a new culture faster than their mothers do, the children need to be a cultural bridge for their mothers. Thus, this study investigates how parentification influences these student’s cultural identity negotiation. To explore this issue, this study used qualitative methodology by ethnographical approach with the students and mothers from a city in the southeastern U.S. The data were collected from deep interviews, observation, and research diaries.


Similar Titles:
Cultural Adjustment and Identity Negotiation: An Ethnographic Study of a Korean Student in an American Academic Community

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Cultural identity crafting across different cultures in the U.S.: An ethnographic study of temporary migrant Korean secondary students


 
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