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Conceptions of social justice

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Abstract:

CIES scholars recognize education’s role in critically examining and advancing social justice and peace. Social justice, which is central to the philosophy and practice of peace education, can be simultaneously both a process and an outcome, depending on the goals, understandings, and contexts that impact the practices and experiences of educators, institutional leaders and administrators, students, and their communities.

Our main goal is to explore how the concept of social justice is understood by participants in formal and informal education and to identify the institutions and experiences that influence their particular understanding from a comparative cross-national perspective.

We review the term social justice from a variety of perspectives to illustrate how it has been regarded ideologically, philosophically, and politically within education research. We then turn to theoretical perspectives on education for social justice, including democracy, citizenship, among others.

This research is exploratory and should be considered as a pilot phase of a long-term project which aims to map the meaning of core concepts in peace education across different populations worldwide. The sample includes stakeholders involved in formal and informal education in urban settings in the U.S. and Colombia. The main instrument is a survey which collects 1) demographic information, 2) personal interpretations of social justice and 2) opinions on the institutions, interpersonal relationships, and specific situations/contexts that influence both the respondent’s understanding of social justice as a process and outcome and his or her position in relation to these.

The findings show that, despite demographic differences, it is possible to recognize similarities between different populations regarding their particular understandings of social justice. The differences are evident in the ways that specific elements influence participants’ individual understandings. The data also suggest improvements for the survey instrument and immediate steps to continue with the long-term project.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493956_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Arnstein, Tammy., Vega, Laura. and Omar, Zohra. "Conceptions of social justice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493956_index.html>

APA Citation:

Arnstein, T. , Vega, L. and Omar, Z. , 2011-04-30 "Conceptions of social justice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493956_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: CIES scholars recognize education’s role in critically examining and advancing social justice and peace. Social justice, which is central to the philosophy and practice of peace education, can be simultaneously both a process and an outcome, depending on the goals, understandings, and contexts that impact the practices and experiences of educators, institutional leaders and administrators, students, and their communities.

Our main goal is to explore how the concept of social justice is understood by participants in formal and informal education and to identify the institutions and experiences that influence their particular understanding from a comparative cross-national perspective.

We review the term social justice from a variety of perspectives to illustrate how it has been regarded ideologically, philosophically, and politically within education research. We then turn to theoretical perspectives on education for social justice, including democracy, citizenship, among others.

This research is exploratory and should be considered as a pilot phase of a long-term project which aims to map the meaning of core concepts in peace education across different populations worldwide. The sample includes stakeholders involved in formal and informal education in urban settings in the U.S. and Colombia. The main instrument is a survey which collects 1) demographic information, 2) personal interpretations of social justice and 2) opinions on the institutions, interpersonal relationships, and specific situations/contexts that influence both the respondent’s understanding of social justice as a process and outcome and his or her position in relation to these.

The findings show that, despite demographic differences, it is possible to recognize similarities between different populations regarding their particular understandings of social justice. The differences are evident in the ways that specific elements influence participants’ individual understandings. The data also suggest improvements for the survey instrument and immediate steps to continue with the long-term project.


Similar Titles:
Conceptions of Democracy, Economic Success and Social Justice in Discourses on Metropolitan Governance: The Social Constructivist Challenge to the Public Choice School

Generational Differences in the Conception of Social Justice and Problems of Intergenerational Solidarity

Platonic versus Liberal Conceptions of Social Justice: A Polemic


 
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