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Qualitative comparative review of literacy development programs in Canada and the USSR

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Abstract:

Literacy development (understood here as acquiring basic reading skills) is one of the most important topics in education as it lays out a foundation for further academic and professional achievements. This topic remains current in Canada and is being addressed by policies from both provincial and federal governments. The literacy program of the Soviet Union, which took place between 1919 and 1936, is among the most successful literacy campaigns to exist. During the relatively short period of time the overall literacy of the population increased from 24% to 85% (Moos, 1967). Although politically and ideologically charged and vastly dogmatic, measures implemented by the program have shown to be highly effective.
This qualitative comparative review aims to identify whether there are common approaches with high potential of success in the literacy campaign of the USSR and today’s Canadian efforts to increase literacy. A summary of selected books describing the Soviet campaign was compared to data from over 150 Canadian policy documents accumulated at the Centre for the Study of Learning and Performance as a part of a systematic review mandated by Canadian Council on Learning and updated with the SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis Grants on the Digital Economy. Our analyses have identified community involvement to be one of the key components for success in implementing large-scale literacy interventions. Though its particular forms varied substantially between two countries due to difference in time, technological development, concept and structure of educational systems, engaging communities remains a powerful means of supporting literacy development.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494078_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Sokolovskaya, Anna. and Borokhovski, Eugene. "Qualitative comparative review of literacy development programs in Canada and the USSR" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494078_index.html>

APA Citation:

Sokolovskaya, A. and Borokhovski, E. , 2011-04-30 "Qualitative comparative review of literacy development programs in Canada and the USSR" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494078_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Literacy development (understood here as acquiring basic reading skills) is one of the most important topics in education as it lays out a foundation for further academic and professional achievements. This topic remains current in Canada and is being addressed by policies from both provincial and federal governments. The literacy program of the Soviet Union, which took place between 1919 and 1936, is among the most successful literacy campaigns to exist. During the relatively short period of time the overall literacy of the population increased from 24% to 85% (Moos, 1967). Although politically and ideologically charged and vastly dogmatic, measures implemented by the program have shown to be highly effective.
This qualitative comparative review aims to identify whether there are common approaches with high potential of success in the literacy campaign of the USSR and today’s Canadian efforts to increase literacy. A summary of selected books describing the Soviet campaign was compared to data from over 150 Canadian policy documents accumulated at the Centre for the Study of Learning and Performance as a part of a systematic review mandated by Canadian Council on Learning and updated with the SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis Grants on the Digital Economy. Our analyses have identified community involvement to be one of the key components for success in implementing large-scale literacy interventions. Though its particular forms varied substantially between two countries due to difference in time, technological development, concept and structure of educational systems, engaging communities remains a powerful means of supporting literacy development.


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