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US involvement in Africa: Higher education during the Cold War

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Abstract:

After World War II, the United States began a thorough overhaul and reassessment of its military and strategic training to include a broader, more regionally based and contextual intelligence. In 1958, the U.S. government created the Bureau of African Affairs in reaction to the rapid decolonization on the continent, beginning with Ghana in 1957. Due to Africa’s strategic geographic position and emerging independent nations, the continent assumed a position of policy importance during the Cold War. In academia, with governmental assistance from the National Defense and Education Act (NDEA) of 1958, American universities began restructuring curriculum and departments to accommodate Area Studies. The African Studies Association (ASA) was founded in 1957 with the mission to promote the study of Africa in the American curriculum. Given the increasing development of African Studies in American Universities, this paper seeks to identify ways in which scholarship concerning Africa was either excluded from or embraced in the American national agenda. Primarily, I will explore how knowledge production concerning Africa during this time period (1945-1968) served as an impetus for intellectual and policy partnerships between the United States and strategic African countries (Nigeria, Ghana, the Congo). Relying on Cold War, Area Studies, Internationalization, and Neocolonial frameworks, the paper utilizes historical archival research to trace the history of American knowledge production concerning Africa in an effort to construct a more complete historical foundation of American-African policies and intellectual partnerships.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494101_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Sinclair, Lauren. "US involvement in Africa: Higher education during the Cold War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494101_index.html>

APA Citation:

Sinclair, L. "US involvement in Africa: Higher education during the Cold War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494101_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: After World War II, the United States began a thorough overhaul and reassessment of its military and strategic training to include a broader, more regionally based and contextual intelligence. In 1958, the U.S. government created the Bureau of African Affairs in reaction to the rapid decolonization on the continent, beginning with Ghana in 1957. Due to Africa’s strategic geographic position and emerging independent nations, the continent assumed a position of policy importance during the Cold War. In academia, with governmental assistance from the National Defense and Education Act (NDEA) of 1958, American universities began restructuring curriculum and departments to accommodate Area Studies. The African Studies Association (ASA) was founded in 1957 with the mission to promote the study of Africa in the American curriculum. Given the increasing development of African Studies in American Universities, this paper seeks to identify ways in which scholarship concerning Africa was either excluded from or embraced in the American national agenda. Primarily, I will explore how knowledge production concerning Africa during this time period (1945-1968) served as an impetus for intellectual and policy partnerships between the United States and strategic African countries (Nigeria, Ghana, the Congo). Relying on Cold War, Area Studies, Internationalization, and Neocolonial frameworks, the paper utilizes historical archival research to trace the history of American knowledge production concerning Africa in an effort to construct a more complete historical foundation of American-African policies and intellectual partnerships.


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(Re)conceptualizing the role of higher education in systems transformation: The case of Agricultural Education and Training in East Africa

Parental Support and Children’s Educational Expectations: Do Children of Actively Involved Parents Set Higher Educational Expectations?


 
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