Citation

ERROR! The consequences of incorrectly analyzing multistage sample designs for education surveys

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Abstract:

Nearly all education surveys use complex (multistage or cluster) sample designs. Commonly, studies sample schools, then students within selected schools. This multistage sampling methodology is more practical, feasible, and cost/time efficient than directly sampling students. However, many professional researchers today analyze data as if students were directly sampled; they do not take the multi-stage sampling methodology into account. Such confusion can lead to erroneous conclusions, typically reporting significant results when in fact the results are not significant.

The goal of this research project is to investigate the frequency that researchers conclude statistical significance by not taking the sampling methodology into consideration when analyzing complex data.

We use real data from an elementary education study that randomly sampled regions then schools then students. We analyze the data in two ways: 1) as though students were directly sampled, 2). as the sample was actually drawn (sampling regions, then schools, then students). We compare the results of 20 parameters and report the number of times the two analyses result in different conclusions.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494108_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Cummiskey, Christopher. "ERROR! The consequences of incorrectly analyzing multistage sample designs for education surveys" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494108_index.html>

APA Citation:

Cummiskey, C. P. , 2011-05-01 "ERROR! The consequences of incorrectly analyzing multistage sample designs for education surveys" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494108_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Nearly all education surveys use complex (multistage or cluster) sample designs. Commonly, studies sample schools, then students within selected schools. This multistage sampling methodology is more practical, feasible, and cost/time efficient than directly sampling students. However, many professional researchers today analyze data as if students were directly sampled; they do not take the multi-stage sampling methodology into account. Such confusion can lead to erroneous conclusions, typically reporting significant results when in fact the results are not significant.

The goal of this research project is to investigate the frequency that researchers conclude statistical significance by not taking the sampling methodology into consideration when analyzing complex data.

We use real data from an elementary education study that randomly sampled regions then schools then students. We analyze the data in two ways: 1) as though students were directly sampled, 2). as the sample was actually drawn (sampling regions, then schools, then students). We compare the results of 20 parameters and report the number of times the two analyses result in different conclusions.


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