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Combating systemic corruption through quality assurance

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Abstract:

One mechanism through which tertiary systems have been working towards liberating higher education from systemic corruption is through quality assurance (QA). For example, by the end of 2007 there were 130 national QA agencies in about a 100 countries (Gnanam, 2008). These agencies work to (a) regulate the development and expansion of higher education and (b) enhance institutional and systemic quality through academic audit, assessment, and/or accreditation (Materu, 2007). In addition, quality assurance agencies are increasingly supportive of the development of national qualification frameworks (QF). However, while these national developments are a positive step towards stemming the tide of educational corruption, they do not guarantee international quality in higher education.
Accordingly, this project will trace the historical formation of regional and international quality assurance bodies. For example, regional QA organizations continue to gain institutional members in Southeast Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, the European Union, and Eurasia. In addition, this project will discuss the current proliferation of international qualification frameworks, like the European Qualifications Framework.
In short, although a variety of stakeholders will ultimately need to formulate broad, systemic changes in higher educational systems to root out corruption, IQA and IQF processes are potent weapons in the fight against international education corruption (Bergan, 2009).

Author's Keywords:

Quality Assurance, Higher Education Corruption
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494166_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Drake, Timothy. "Combating systemic corruption through quality assurance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494166_index.html>

APA Citation:

Drake, T. "Combating systemic corruption through quality assurance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494166_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: One mechanism through which tertiary systems have been working towards liberating higher education from systemic corruption is through quality assurance (QA). For example, by the end of 2007 there were 130 national QA agencies in about a 100 countries (Gnanam, 2008). These agencies work to (a) regulate the development and expansion of higher education and (b) enhance institutional and systemic quality through academic audit, assessment, and/or accreditation (Materu, 2007). In addition, quality assurance agencies are increasingly supportive of the development of national qualification frameworks (QF). However, while these national developments are a positive step towards stemming the tide of educational corruption, they do not guarantee international quality in higher education.
Accordingly, this project will trace the historical formation of regional and international quality assurance bodies. For example, regional QA organizations continue to gain institutional members in Southeast Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, the European Union, and Eurasia. In addition, this project will discuss the current proliferation of international qualification frameworks, like the European Qualifications Framework.
In short, although a variety of stakeholders will ultimately need to formulate broad, systemic changes in higher educational systems to root out corruption, IQA and IQF processes are potent weapons in the fight against international education corruption (Bergan, 2009).


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