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School Climate and Academic Achievement: Unpacking the relations between school context and the academic achievement of at-risk students

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Abstract:

There is a growing body of research that shows that school climate is associated with important behavioral and educational outcomes, including achievement, attendance, and problem behavior. Collectively, these studies suggest that the social context of school settings may influence students’ ability to benefit from their schooling. Other studies have focused on the influence of various personal characteristics of on school outcomes. These studies suggests that African-American students, English language learners, and students eligible to receive free or reduced priced lunches are all at greater risk for poor academic outcomes than their peers. Although contextual differences within and between schools are frequently acknowledged, few studies have examined whether at-risk students experience systematically different social environments at school, or whether the social context is differentially important to students who are at risk for poor performance. In this presentation we explore these questions using survey and administrative data from approximately 5,000 middle school students in an urban/suburban school district in a southeastern state. Specifically, using multi-level modeling we investigate four questions: a) Do students at risk for poor performance experience systematic differences in school climate? b) If so, does these differences help explain group differences in school performance? c) Is the school climate of differentially important to at-risk groups? d) Do these difference persist across academic years? Preliminary analysis indicates some varying relations between risk categories, school climate and achievement. While generally students experience greater academic achievement with more positive school climates, this effect is attenuated for students eligible to receive free or reduced priced lunches. Also, in contrast to low-income and African American students, school climate appears to have no effect at all on the achievement of English language learners.
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Association:
Name: SCRA Biennial Meeting
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http://www.scra27.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p497340_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Nation, Maury., Voight, Adam. and Nixon, Carol. "School Climate and Academic Achievement: Unpacking the relations between school context and the academic achievement of at-risk students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p497340_index.html>

APA Citation:

Nation, M. , Voight, A. and Nixon, C. "School Climate and Academic Achievement: Unpacking the relations between school context and the academic achievement of at-risk students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p497340_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: There is a growing body of research that shows that school climate is associated with important behavioral and educational outcomes, including achievement, attendance, and problem behavior. Collectively, these studies suggest that the social context of school settings may influence students’ ability to benefit from their schooling. Other studies have focused on the influence of various personal characteristics of on school outcomes. These studies suggests that African-American students, English language learners, and students eligible to receive free or reduced priced lunches are all at greater risk for poor academic outcomes than their peers. Although contextual differences within and between schools are frequently acknowledged, few studies have examined whether at-risk students experience systematically different social environments at school, or whether the social context is differentially important to students who are at risk for poor performance. In this presentation we explore these questions using survey and administrative data from approximately 5,000 middle school students in an urban/suburban school district in a southeastern state. Specifically, using multi-level modeling we investigate four questions: a) Do students at risk for poor performance experience systematic differences in school climate? b) If so, does these differences help explain group differences in school performance? c) Is the school climate of differentially important to at-risk groups? d) Do these difference persist across academic years? Preliminary analysis indicates some varying relations between risk categories, school climate and achievement. While generally students experience greater academic achievement with more positive school climates, this effect is attenuated for students eligible to receive free or reduced priced lunches. Also, in contrast to low-income and African American students, school climate appears to have no effect at all on the achievement of English language learners.


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Classroom Management, School Staff Relations, School Climate, and Academic Achievement: Testing a Model with Urban High School Teachers


 
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