Citation

Changing patterns of access to education in Anglophone and Francophone countries in Sub Saharan Africa: Is education for all pro-poor?

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Abstract:

This research explores changing patterns of access to basic education in thirteen countries in Sub Saharan African (SSA) countries. It is part of the major research programme of the Consortium for Research on Educational Access, Transitions and Equity (CREATE) supported by DFID. The initiatives associated with Education for All (EFA) and in the Millennium Development Goals should have resulted in increased participation in basic education by children from the poorest quintiles of household wealth relative to those in wealthier households. It should also have resulted in lower levels of gendered inequity; and smaller variations between urban and rural areas. And the proportions of children who are significantly over age for their grade (and thus at risk of drop out) should have fallen. This paper uses data from educational management systems and household surveys to explore changing patterns of grade specific enrolment over time, the extent to which such changes have had a different impact on children in the poorest and richest households, and the extent to which the proportion of over age children in the school population has changed. It finds that expanded access has often not been pro-poor contrary to the aspirations of EFA. In some countries the poorest have benefitted less than the less poor. And widely poverty remains the most powerful predictor of being out of school and dropping out. If EFA is to contribute to social greater equity, social justice, stability and growth it must ensure that its benefits reach out to the poorest.

Author's Keywords:

Educational Access, Wealth, Inequality, Over age, Basic Education, Participation, SSA
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p498017_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lewin, Keith. and Sabates, Ricardo. "Changing patterns of access to education in Anglophone and Francophone countries in Sub Saharan Africa: Is education for all pro-poor?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p498017_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lewin, K. and Sabates, R. , 2011-05-01 "Changing patterns of access to education in Anglophone and Francophone countries in Sub Saharan Africa: Is education for all pro-poor?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p498017_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research explores changing patterns of access to basic education in thirteen countries in Sub Saharan African (SSA) countries. It is part of the major research programme of the Consortium for Research on Educational Access, Transitions and Equity (CREATE) supported by DFID. The initiatives associated with Education for All (EFA) and in the Millennium Development Goals should have resulted in increased participation in basic education by children from the poorest quintiles of household wealth relative to those in wealthier households. It should also have resulted in lower levels of gendered inequity; and smaller variations between urban and rural areas. And the proportions of children who are significantly over age for their grade (and thus at risk of drop out) should have fallen. This paper uses data from educational management systems and household surveys to explore changing patterns of grade specific enrolment over time, the extent to which such changes have had a different impact on children in the poorest and richest households, and the extent to which the proportion of over age children in the school population has changed. It finds that expanded access has often not been pro-poor contrary to the aspirations of EFA. In some countries the poorest have benefitted less than the less poor. And widely poverty remains the most powerful predictor of being out of school and dropping out. If EFA is to contribute to social greater equity, social justice, stability and growth it must ensure that its benefits reach out to the poorest.


Similar Titles:
Dimensions of Disparity: Causes of Inequity between Boys and Girls in Access to Education in sub-Saharan Africa

Education and Family Change: A Study of the Changing Patterns of Family Formation in Industrialized Countries

Institutional continuity and change in higher education in Sub-Saharan Africa: An overview of trends and issues

Dimensions of Disparity: Social, Cultural, and Economic Causes for the Inequality Between Boys and Girls in Access to Education in sub-Saharan Africa


 
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