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To be Young, Male, and Black: Black Males’ Perspectives on Hip-Hop, Racial Identity, and Masculinity

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Abstract:

Racial identity has gained increasing theoretical, empirical and practical salience as the racial composition of our nation has shifted. Yet, little research has examined how individuals define membership in their group and factors that promote a positive or negative racial identity. The way in which one defines racial group membership may have strong implications for behavioral outcomes. For example, if one that to be Black means to be tough, athletic and street smart, a strong racial identity will have different consequences for behavior than if he or she defined Black as being educated, hard working and ambitious. Therefore two questions emerge, how do African Americans define their group membership and what influences their definition? This paper explores the role of hip-hop media and culture in African American males’ definitions of Black identity. Hip-hop media plays a prominent role in the lifestyles of African American youth (Cohen et al., 2007). Critics point out that the violence and misogyny in hip-hop media is detrimental to youth, however research has yet to confirm a link between hip-hop media and risky attitudes and behaviors. We sought to examine this link in the current study. A grounded theory based analysis of 11 focus groups, with African American males ranging from 9- to 24-years-old, revealed that hip-hop media plays a significant role in the lives of African American males. Specifically, participants reported experiencing peer pressure to enjoy hip-hop music and to conform to images of Black men portrayed in hip-hop media. Participants also felt that hip-hop media is important for the racial identity of African Americans as a whole. They reported that hip-hop has both negative and positive impacts on Black identity – it is an art form that serves as a source of cultural pride, but it also contributes to stereotypes and degrades Black women.
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Association:
Name: SCRA Biennial Meeting
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http://www.scra27.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p498085_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Springle, Tamara. and French, Sabine. "To be Young, Male, and Black: Black Males’ Perspectives on Hip-Hop, Racial Identity, and Masculinity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p498085_index.html>

APA Citation:

Springle, T. and French, S. "To be Young, Male, and Black: Black Males’ Perspectives on Hip-Hop, Racial Identity, and Masculinity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p498085_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Racial identity has gained increasing theoretical, empirical and practical salience as the racial composition of our nation has shifted. Yet, little research has examined how individuals define membership in their group and factors that promote a positive or negative racial identity. The way in which one defines racial group membership may have strong implications for behavioral outcomes. For example, if one that to be Black means to be tough, athletic and street smart, a strong racial identity will have different consequences for behavior than if he or she defined Black as being educated, hard working and ambitious. Therefore two questions emerge, how do African Americans define their group membership and what influences their definition? This paper explores the role of hip-hop media and culture in African American males’ definitions of Black identity. Hip-hop media plays a prominent role in the lifestyles of African American youth (Cohen et al., 2007). Critics point out that the violence and misogyny in hip-hop media is detrimental to youth, however research has yet to confirm a link between hip-hop media and risky attitudes and behaviors. We sought to examine this link in the current study. A grounded theory based analysis of 11 focus groups, with African American males ranging from 9- to 24-years-old, revealed that hip-hop media plays a significant role in the lives of African American males. Specifically, participants reported experiencing peer pressure to enjoy hip-hop music and to conform to images of Black men portrayed in hip-hop media. Participants also felt that hip-hop media is important for the racial identity of African Americans as a whole. They reported that hip-hop has both negative and positive impacts on Black identity – it is an art form that serves as a source of cultural pride, but it also contributes to stereotypes and degrades Black women.


Similar Titles:
Ain’t Worried About nothing: Black Masculinity in the Context of Hip Hop

(In)visible Black Males: A Qualitative Study of The Narratives of Black Masculine Identities at the Pebbles School

That Supposed To Be Me?” Marginalized Young Black Women Talk Back to ‘Hip Hop’

Hip hop and spoken word: A lens into the lives of young Black men


 
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