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One Nation Under Surveillance: A New Social Contract to Defend Freedom Without Sacrificing Liberty

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Abstract:

What limits, if any, should be placed on a government’s efforts to spy on its own citizens in the name of national security? Recent battles over privacy have been dominated by fights over warrantless electronic surveillance or CCTV; the coming years will see debates over DNA databases, data mining, and biometric identification. There will be protests and lawsuits, editorials and elections resisting these attacks on privacy. Those battles are worthy. But the war will be lost. Modern threats increasingly require that governments collect such information, governments are increasingly able to collect it, and citizens increasingly accept that they will collect it. This paper (based on a book to be published by Oxford University Press in February 2011) proposes a move away from questions of whether governments should collect information and onto more problematic and relevant questions concerning its use. By reframing the relationship between privacy and security in the language of a social contract, mediated by a citizenry who are active participants rather than passive targets, the book offers a framework to defend freedom without sacrificing liberty.

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Name: International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition"
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MLA Citation:

Chesterman, Simon. "One Nation Under Surveillance: A New Social Contract to Defend Freedom Without Sacrificing Liberty" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-02-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500002_index.html>

APA Citation:

Chesterman, S. , 2011-03-16 "One Nation Under Surveillance: A New Social Contract to Defend Freedom Without Sacrificing Liberty" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-02-09 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500002_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What limits, if any, should be placed on a government’s efforts to spy on its own citizens in the name of national security? Recent battles over privacy have been dominated by fights over warrantless electronic surveillance or CCTV; the coming years will see debates over DNA databases, data mining, and biometric identification. There will be protests and lawsuits, editorials and elections resisting these attacks on privacy. Those battles are worthy. But the war will be lost. Modern threats increasingly require that governments collect such information, governments are increasingly able to collect it, and citizens increasingly accept that they will collect it. This paper (based on a book to be published by Oxford University Press in February 2011) proposes a move away from questions of whether governments should collect information and onto more problematic and relevant questions concerning its use. By reframing the relationship between privacy and security in the language of a social contract, mediated by a citizenry who are active participants rather than passive targets, the book offers a framework to defend freedom without sacrificing liberty.


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