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Delivering Drinking Water to Expanding Cities in the Middle East and North Africa

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Abstract:

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is the most water-stressed region in the world. Annual renewable water availability per person varies from 2,000 m3 in Iran to below 500 m3 in Jordan, Yemen, Oman, and Algeria, and projected population growth is expected to halve this quantity by 2050 (World Bank, 2007). The region also confronts the highest urbanization rates in the developing world. Much of this urban expansion is occurring outside of formally designated urban areas. For instance, residents in Egypt’s informal areas account for 65 percent of the total urban population (Sejourne 2009). The majority of the residents in these informal areas lack access to clean and reliable drinking water. As governments attempt to expand municipal household water distribution systems to formal and informal urban areas, such as Cairo and Amman, their task is complicated by old and deteriorating infrastructure that increases the opportunities for leakage and contamination by sewage lines. In this paper, we seek to explore (1) the water quality crisis that is mounting in MENA, generally, and as it pertains to cities, specifically and (2) the political-economy of different interventions (e.g., privatization, public-private partnerships, micro-finance alternatives) for delivering water to growing cities in MENA.
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Name: International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition"
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MLA Citation:

Zawahri, Neda., Weinthal, Erika. and Sowers, Jeannie. "Delivering Drinking Water to Expanding Cities in the Middle East and North Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-01-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p501741_index.html>

APA Citation:

Zawahri, N. , Weinthal, E. S. and Sowers, J. L. , 2011-03-16 "Delivering Drinking Water to Expanding Cities in the Middle East and North Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA <Not Available>. 2014-01-05 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p501741_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is the most water-stressed region in the world. Annual renewable water availability per person varies from 2,000 m3 in Iran to below 500 m3 in Jordan, Yemen, Oman, and Algeria, and projected population growth is expected to halve this quantity by 2050 (World Bank, 2007). The region also confronts the highest urbanization rates in the developing world. Much of this urban expansion is occurring outside of formally designated urban areas. For instance, residents in Egypt’s informal areas account for 65 percent of the total urban population (Sejourne 2009). The majority of the residents in these informal areas lack access to clean and reliable drinking water. As governments attempt to expand municipal household water distribution systems to formal and informal urban areas, such as Cairo and Amman, their task is complicated by old and deteriorating infrastructure that increases the opportunities for leakage and contamination by sewage lines. In this paper, we seek to explore (1) the water quality crisis that is mounting in MENA, generally, and as it pertains to cities, specifically and (2) the political-economy of different interventions (e.g., privatization, public-private partnerships, micro-finance alternatives) for delivering water to growing cities in MENA.

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Associated Document Available International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition"
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