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Indivisibility and Conflict Revisited: How Indivisibility Makes for Peace and Divisibility Makes for War

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Abstract:

How does the perceived indivisibility of territory affect the patterns of war between states? The conventional wisdom suggests that indivisibility increases the likelihood of conflict between states. However, analyzing the impacts of divisibility/indivisibility of territory on the patterns in war in the context of a rational bargaining framework reveals that indivisibility of territory in fact decreases the likelihood of territorial conflict among states but increases the risk of escalation of war once it breaks out; conversely, divisibility of territory increases the risk of war but decreases the risk that war will escalate once it erupts. Indivisibility of an issue, while making mid-war bargaining an extremely costly enterprise for the relevant parties, paradoxically creates incentives for the actors to prevent the pre-war bargaining processes from falling apart, thereby limiting the likelihood of conflict in the first place. In order to provide empirical support for this argument, I utilize the evidence on the patterns of territorial war in the modern state system since 1648 by building on the empirically-informed assumption that the rise of nationalism throughout the 19th century, due to the territory-related audience costs it created, has made territory more of an indivisible good.
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Association:
Name: International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition"
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http://www.isanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502152_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Kadercan, Burak. "Indivisibility and Conflict Revisited: How Indivisibility Makes for Peace and Divisibility Makes for War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-02-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502152_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kadercan, B. , 2011-03-16 "Indivisibility and Conflict Revisited: How Indivisibility Makes for Peace and Divisibility Makes for War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA <Not Available>. 2019-02-09 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502152_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: How does the perceived indivisibility of territory affect the patterns of war between states? The conventional wisdom suggests that indivisibility increases the likelihood of conflict between states. However, analyzing the impacts of divisibility/indivisibility of territory on the patterns in war in the context of a rational bargaining framework reveals that indivisibility of territory in fact decreases the likelihood of territorial conflict among states but increases the risk of escalation of war once it breaks out; conversely, divisibility of territory increases the risk of war but decreases the risk that war will escalate once it erupts. Indivisibility of an issue, while making mid-war bargaining an extremely costly enterprise for the relevant parties, paradoxically creates incentives for the actors to prevent the pre-war bargaining processes from falling apart, thereby limiting the likelihood of conflict in the first place. In order to provide empirical support for this argument, I utilize the evidence on the patterns of territorial war in the modern state system since 1648 by building on the empirically-informed assumption that the rise of nationalism throughout the 19th century, due to the territory-related audience costs it created, has made territory more of an indivisible good.


 
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