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When Negotiating Trade Means Negotiating Difference: Ethical Engagements at the Margins of International Trade Negotiations

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Abstract:

Small developing states are scheduled to be treated as equal players in the neoliberal trading system. But vulnerabilities associated with size, location, and governance capacity circumscribe the way in which these states can participate: They are not equal players – they are different. Debates rage as to whether the removal of special and differential treatment for these states at the urging of larger, more powerful states will benefit the former. In these debates, small states explicitly appeal to justice to advance their concerns.
Taking Commonwealth Caribbean states as representative of such states, this study asks: What do Commonwealth Caribbean trade negotiators mean when they appeal to justice? This study is significant as being the first effort to systematically unearth and analyze the views of small developing state trade negotiators as to their understandings of justice. It finds that these negotiators perceive such justice as being justice to difference because of the distinct characteristics of small developing states which combine to constrain their participation in the international trading system; based on this perception, they seek new rules and outcomes in the multilateral trade regime which are sensitive to such different characteristics, that is, recognition of particularity versus the universalism of neoliberal trade.
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Association:
Name: International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition"
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http://www.isanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502624_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Samuel, Lisa. "When Negotiating Trade Means Negotiating Difference: Ethical Engagements at the Margins of International Trade Negotiations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502624_index.html>

APA Citation:

Samuel, L. M. , 2011-03-16 "When Negotiating Trade Means Negotiating Difference: Ethical Engagements at the Margins of International Trade Negotiations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502624_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Small developing states are scheduled to be treated as equal players in the neoliberal trading system. But vulnerabilities associated with size, location, and governance capacity circumscribe the way in which these states can participate: They are not equal players – they are different. Debates rage as to whether the removal of special and differential treatment for these states at the urging of larger, more powerful states will benefit the former. In these debates, small states explicitly appeal to justice to advance their concerns.
Taking Commonwealth Caribbean states as representative of such states, this study asks: What do Commonwealth Caribbean trade negotiators mean when they appeal to justice? This study is significant as being the first effort to systematically unearth and analyze the views of small developing state trade negotiators as to their understandings of justice. It finds that these negotiators perceive such justice as being justice to difference because of the distinct characteristics of small developing states which combine to constrain their participation in the international trading system; based on this perception, they seek new rules and outcomes in the multilateral trade regime which are sensitive to such different characteristics, that is, recognition of particularity versus the universalism of neoliberal trade.


Similar Titles:
Activating Ethical Engagement in Organizations: Negotiating Ethical Tensions and Practices in a Business Ethics Initiative

Trading In(Justice): Ethical Engagements at the Margins of International Trade Negotiations


 
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