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A time-trend analysis of the sexualization of girls in music videos and magazine advertisements

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Abstract:

The sexualization of girls (e.g., females < 18) has been widely decried by psychologists (American Psychological Association, 2007). Past research on women has shown sexualization to have multiple negative effects (e.g., low self-esteem, depression, and eating disorders) (APA, 2007; Choate & Curry, 2009). Although research examining the influence of sexualization on girls has been rare, these results may well generalize to them. Developmentally, girls may be even more affected than women by sexualized media portrayals because girls’ self-identity is still being formed (Levin & Kilbourne, 2008). The mass media is one way by which sexualized cultural values about girls and women are transmitted. Research indicates that regardless of media genre (e.g., magazines, television), women are routinely sexualized. However, few studies have examined the sexualization of girls specifically (APA, 2007). The results of a quantitative content analysis examining (a) the prevalence of sexualization of girls, (b) the degree to which it has been increasing over the past 15 years, and (c) differences in portrayal of sexualization based upon ethnicity in MTV music videos and Seventeen magazine advertisements will be reported. The content analysis data was statistically analyzed using proportion, time-trend regression analyses, and chi-square analyses. The results provide evidence that is integral to understanding the level of risk media sexualization poses for girls by showing (a) how intensely girls are being sexualized and (b) the degree to which sexualization of girls is increasing. The results also increase the knowledge base regarding the intersection of sexualization and ethnicity in media. The implications of the results for developing disorder-prevention and health-promotion programs with girls will be discussed. The results may also have implications for social policy. Arguably, steps may be necessary to decrease sexualized media messages about girls since the results indicate girls are being increasingly exploited via current media strategies.
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Association:
Name: SCRA Biennial Meeting
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http://www.scra27.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p503297_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Vokey, Megan. "A time-trend analysis of the sexualization of girls in music videos and magazine advertisements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL, Jun 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p503297_index.html>

APA Citation:

Vokey, M. , 2011-06-15 "A time-trend analysis of the sexualization of girls in music videos and magazine advertisements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p503297_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The sexualization of girls (e.g., females < 18) has been widely decried by psychologists (American Psychological Association, 2007). Past research on women has shown sexualization to have multiple negative effects (e.g., low self-esteem, depression, and eating disorders) (APA, 2007; Choate & Curry, 2009). Although research examining the influence of sexualization on girls has been rare, these results may well generalize to them. Developmentally, girls may be even more affected than women by sexualized media portrayals because girls’ self-identity is still being formed (Levin & Kilbourne, 2008). The mass media is one way by which sexualized cultural values about girls and women are transmitted. Research indicates that regardless of media genre (e.g., magazines, television), women are routinely sexualized. However, few studies have examined the sexualization of girls specifically (APA, 2007). The results of a quantitative content analysis examining (a) the prevalence of sexualization of girls, (b) the degree to which it has been increasing over the past 15 years, and (c) differences in portrayal of sexualization based upon ethnicity in MTV music videos and Seventeen magazine advertisements will be reported. The content analysis data was statistically analyzed using proportion, time-trend regression analyses, and chi-square analyses. The results provide evidence that is integral to understanding the level of risk media sexualization poses for girls by showing (a) how intensely girls are being sexualized and (b) the degree to which sexualization of girls is increasing. The results also increase the knowledge base regarding the intersection of sexualization and ethnicity in media. The implications of the results for developing disorder-prevention and health-promotion programs with girls will be discussed. The results may also have implications for social policy. Arguably, steps may be necessary to decrease sexualized media messages about girls since the results indicate girls are being increasingly exploited via current media strategies.


Similar Titles:
Sexualized Representations in Music Videos: A Content Analysis Comparing Gender and Genre

The Relationship between Exposure to Sexual Music Videos and College Students’ Risky Sexual Behavior

Simultaneous Portrayals of Sex and Violence in Music Lyrics and Music Video Images: A Content Analysis of Mainstream Music Media


 
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