Citation

Marital Transitions and Weight Changes

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Abstract:

Marital transitions cause changes in diet and activity patterns that affect weight. Previous studies show that marriage is linked to weight gain, while marital exit is linked to weight loss. But it is uncertain whether the weight changes that follow marital transitions are significant enough to affect health. Applying marital resource and crisis models, we explore weight changes that predict an increased risk of all-cause mortality in the epidemiological literature. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth ’79, we test whether recent marriages and marital exits affect the odds of experiencing mortality-linked weight changes and explore how sex and age at marital transition is associated with weight changes. We find marriage predicts large weight gain: large gains are more likely for newly married women than men, and more likely for those who marred early than those who married later, but level off over time. Marital exits, on the other hand, do not predict weight loss, especially for those who divorce at later ages. We conclude that any marriage transition is, typically, not enough of a shock to lifestyle to elicit large and repeated weight gains.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

weight (240), marit (137), marriag (115), chang (89), gain (83), transit (74), bmi (63), effect (59), loss (58), age (53), marri (53), mortal (44), health (43), year (42), predict (42), obes (40), exit (39), larg (32), respond (31), risk (31), women (30),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507191_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Tumin, Dmitry. and Qian, Zhenchao. "Marital Transitions and Weight Changes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507191_index.html>

APA Citation:

Tumin, D. and Qian, Z. , 2011-08-19 "Marital Transitions and Weight Changes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507191_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Marital transitions cause changes in diet and activity patterns that affect weight. Previous studies show that marriage is linked to weight gain, while marital exit is linked to weight loss. But it is uncertain whether the weight changes that follow marital transitions are significant enough to affect health. Applying marital resource and crisis models, we explore weight changes that predict an increased risk of all-cause mortality in the epidemiological literature. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth ’79, we test whether recent marriages and marital exits affect the odds of experiencing mortality-linked weight changes and explore how sex and age at marital transition is associated with weight changes. We find marriage predicts large weight gain: large gains are more likely for newly married women than men, and more likely for those who marred early than those who married later, but level off over time. Marital exits, on the other hand, do not predict weight loss, especially for those who divorce at later ages. We conclude that any marriage transition is, typically, not enough of a shock to lifestyle to elicit large and repeated weight gains.


Similar Titles:
Weighing Women Down: Messages on Weight Loss and Body Shaping in Editorial Content in Popular Women’s Health and Fitness Magazines

Marital Status, Self-rated Health, and Mortality: Overestimation of Health or Diminishing Protection of Marriage?


 
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