Citation

The Basis of “Self-Sufficiency”: Nonstandard Work, Civil Society Organizations, Labor Brokers and Migrant Labor Systems

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Abstract:

This paper is in dialogue with two sets of literature. First, I engage with studies about nonstandard work. I suggest that triangular employment relations may slowly be replaced by rectangular employment relations. In these arrangements, in addition to having two separate employers—the labor broker and the de facto employer—workers also have ties with civil society organizations geared toward constituting “self-sufficient” subjects out of marginalized groups. In particular, I consider the partnership that is struck between labor brokers and immigrant assistance organizations. Temp agencies benefit from these partnerships by: procuring a pliable workforce, passing on costs to the organizations and the workfare state, and reaping symbolic rewards for “helping the community.” Second, this paper engages with Michael Burawoy’s classic model of migrant labor systems and literature about global instances of labor brokerage. Temp agencies in the US are part of the labor brokerage that characterizes the global “bounded” labor market. Immigrant assistance organizations are responding to a particular state project which, via federal immigration policies and the institutionalization of a workfare system of provision, produces a politically and economically marginalized worker-subject. Given these circumstances, organizations have been more open to partnering with temp agencies. Although rectangular employment arrangements may be helping politically vulnerable subjects engage in an otherwise inaccessible labor market, I question the extent to which this can eventually be the basis of true “self-sufficiency.” I conclude that the globally patterned symbiotic relationship between the state, labor brokers and migrant worker-subjects requires further empirical and theoretical exploration.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

labor (99), agenc (92), organ (68), worker (60), work (59), temp (58), employ (54), state (44), migrant (43), job (41), client (41), immigr (35), temporari (31), broker (27), societi (25), help (25), manag (23), assist (21), system (21), rectangular (20), servic (20),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507336_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Elcioglu, Emine Fidan. "The Basis of “Self-Sufficiency”: Nonstandard Work, Civil Society Organizations, Labor Brokers and Migrant Labor Systems" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507336_index.html>

APA Citation:

Elcioglu, E. , 2011-08-19 "The Basis of “Self-Sufficiency”: Nonstandard Work, Civil Society Organizations, Labor Brokers and Migrant Labor Systems" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV Online <PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507336_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is in dialogue with two sets of literature. First, I engage with studies about nonstandard work. I suggest that triangular employment relations may slowly be replaced by rectangular employment relations. In these arrangements, in addition to having two separate employers—the labor broker and the de facto employer—workers also have ties with civil society organizations geared toward constituting “self-sufficient” subjects out of marginalized groups. In particular, I consider the partnership that is struck between labor brokers and immigrant assistance organizations. Temp agencies benefit from these partnerships by: procuring a pliable workforce, passing on costs to the organizations and the workfare state, and reaping symbolic rewards for “helping the community.” Second, this paper engages with Michael Burawoy’s classic model of migrant labor systems and literature about global instances of labor brokerage. Temp agencies in the US are part of the labor brokerage that characterizes the global “bounded” labor market. Immigrant assistance organizations are responding to a particular state project which, via federal immigration policies and the institutionalization of a workfare system of provision, produces a politically and economically marginalized worker-subject. Given these circumstances, organizations have been more open to partnering with temp agencies. Although rectangular employment arrangements may be helping politically vulnerable subjects engage in an otherwise inaccessible labor market, I question the extent to which this can eventually be the basis of true “self-sufficiency.” I conclude that the globally patterned symbiotic relationship between the state, labor brokers and migrant worker-subjects requires further empirical and theoretical exploration.


Similar Titles:
Litigating to Organize: Workers’ Centers, Immigrant Workers and the National Labor Relations Act

Induced Circularity for “Selective” Immigrant Workers?: Temporary Migrant Worker Programs in Spain

Employment Protection and the Diffusion of Temporary Help Agency Employment in US Organizations, 1971 to 2000


 
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