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Managing Democracy: Technocratic Aid, Governance, and the Philippine State

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Abstract:

This paper examines how the Philippines became a primary postwar site for the development and dissemination of a transnational anti-communist politics. In this paper, titled, Managing Democracy: Technocratic Aid, Governance, and the Philippine State, I consider the relationship between technical consultants from the United States and Philippine universities, and the evolution of post-independence Philippine government. Through a case study of the University of Michigan’s role in establishing a school of Public Administration at the University of the Philppines, I argue that through their experience in the Philippines, American policymakers imagined University-driven development projects as potential models for other developing states. Characterized by Filipino leaders and U.S. policymakers as early sites of tension in a global Cold War, struggles over the direction and organization of the Philippine state, contributed to the development of a globally oriented anti-communist movement. Indeed, during the late 1940s and 1950s, U.S. policymakers and Filipino elites developed what they conceived of as exportable models for postcolonial development.
In this paper, I explore the transformation of colonial governance in the Philippines and the production of a political language of anti-communism that hinged on ideas about the efficiency and burecratic management of modern states. Cloaked in sanitized language of technical aid and mutual interest, the establishment of School of Public Administration and its role in the reorganization and training of Philippine government workers, further erased the legacies of American colonial violence while simultaneously justifying a continued U.S. intervention in the Philippines.
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Association:
Name: American Studies Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.theasa.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509072_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Woods, Colleen. "Managing Democracy: Technocratic Aid, Governance, and the Philippine State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509072_index.html>

APA Citation:

Woods, C. "Managing Democracy: Technocratic Aid, Governance, and the Philippine State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509072_index.html

Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: This paper examines how the Philippines became a primary postwar site for the development and dissemination of a transnational anti-communist politics. In this paper, titled, Managing Democracy: Technocratic Aid, Governance, and the Philippine State, I consider the relationship between technical consultants from the United States and Philippine universities, and the evolution of post-independence Philippine government. Through a case study of the University of Michigan’s role in establishing a school of Public Administration at the University of the Philppines, I argue that through their experience in the Philippines, American policymakers imagined University-driven development projects as potential models for other developing states. Characterized by Filipino leaders and U.S. policymakers as early sites of tension in a global Cold War, struggles over the direction and organization of the Philippine state, contributed to the development of a globally oriented anti-communist movement. Indeed, during the late 1940s and 1950s, U.S. policymakers and Filipino elites developed what they conceived of as exportable models for postcolonial development.
In this paper, I explore the transformation of colonial governance in the Philippines and the production of a political language of anti-communism that hinged on ideas about the efficiency and burecratic management of modern states. Cloaked in sanitized language of technical aid and mutual interest, the establishment of School of Public Administration and its role in the reorganization and training of Philippine government workers, further erased the legacies of American colonial violence while simultaneously justifying a continued U.S. intervention in the Philippines.


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