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Performing Metaphors of Illness in Chay Yew’s A Language of Their Own

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Abstract:

In 2003, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the National Institute of Health (NIH) changed prevention funding and policy to focus specifically on those at “high risk” for HIV and their HIV positive partners. With this change, however, funding for community-based HIV organizations outreaching to ethnic minorities, adolescents, and women were eliminated. This paper expands upon the importance of racial, ethnic, national, and sexual intersectional paradigms to discussions about HIV/AIDS prevention and health. Through a close examination of Chay Yew’s A Language of Their Own (1995), the first Asian/American play to depict characters living with AIDS, and the outreach work of the Asian and Pacific Islander Coalition on HIV/AIDS (APICHA), the largest New York City HIV/AIDS organization serving Asian/Americans, I argue for the important role that minority performance and experience has always had in the discussion of illness alongside and not separate from public policy. Rather than represent characters that pine for selves without HIV/AIDS, Yew’s play instead foregrounds the connections between being “ill” and being “unassimilated.” In a similar fashion, APICHA’s outreach material deals with alienation, domestic violence, and migratory isolation as effective metaphors for beginning conversations about HIV/AIDS with more culturally conservative populations. This paper highlights the crucial role that minority performance has always had in the discussions of HIV/AIDS, providing a more in-depth and effective rumination on the pointed issues that must affect prevention strategy, policy, and funding.
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Name: American Studies Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.theasa.net


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509764_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Diaz, Robert. "Performing Metaphors of Illness in Chay Yew’s A Language of Their Own" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509764_index.html>

APA Citation:

Diaz, R. G. "Performing Metaphors of Illness in Chay Yew’s A Language of Their Own" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509764_index.html

Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: In 2003, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the National Institute of Health (NIH) changed prevention funding and policy to focus specifically on those at “high risk” for HIV and their HIV positive partners. With this change, however, funding for community-based HIV organizations outreaching to ethnic minorities, adolescents, and women were eliminated. This paper expands upon the importance of racial, ethnic, national, and sexual intersectional paradigms to discussions about HIV/AIDS prevention and health. Through a close examination of Chay Yew’s A Language of Their Own (1995), the first Asian/American play to depict characters living with AIDS, and the outreach work of the Asian and Pacific Islander Coalition on HIV/AIDS (APICHA), the largest New York City HIV/AIDS organization serving Asian/Americans, I argue for the important role that minority performance and experience has always had in the discussion of illness alongside and not separate from public policy. Rather than represent characters that pine for selves without HIV/AIDS, Yew’s play instead foregrounds the connections between being “ill” and being “unassimilated.” In a similar fashion, APICHA’s outreach material deals with alienation, domestic violence, and migratory isolation as effective metaphors for beginning conversations about HIV/AIDS with more culturally conservative populations. This paper highlights the crucial role that minority performance has always had in the discussions of HIV/AIDS, providing a more in-depth and effective rumination on the pointed issues that must affect prevention strategy, policy, and funding.


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