Citation

The Political Psychology of Cultural Assimilation: When Evolutionary Game Theory meets a Lay Theory.

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

An all time high in global migration have brought diverse cultures into close contact – sometimes with disastrous consequences for both the host and immigrant cultures. However, these negative outcomes are not inevitable. We model the fitness of an immigrant population to assimilate into a larger host population as a coordination game in an evolutionary setting. In this game, an immigrant’s benefit for the self is shaped by her lay theory, namely whether one’s cultural identity is perceived as fixed (entity theorist) or malleable (incremental theorist). Identifying with either culture can have an associated affective cost (e.g. shame). Whether a culture of assimilation prevails or not depends on whether a particular cultural identity is fitter than any other. This fitness is a function of the likelihood of interaction among individuals - which determines the aforementioned costs and benefits - chosen randomly from these cultures. We find that assimilation may not be inevitable in liberal democracies even when the net benefits of such assimilation far outweigh the net benefits of retaining an immigrant culture. However, while prejudice might exacerbate this outcome, the repeated interaction propensity between cultures (and therefore the possibility of punishment strategies that encourage assimilation while discouraging retention of immigrant cultures) might lead to greater assimilation and therefore the most favorable outcome for both cultures.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

individu (159), accultur (111), cultur (109), allocentr (82), e (58), host (57), ca (47), x (46), idiocentr (41), bi (41), assimil (40), collectivist (39), societi (35), individualist (34), bg (33), 1 (33), g (30), theori (29), 2 (28), cost (28), popul (28),

Author's Keywords:

Culture Assimilation Evolutionary Game theory Lay Theory
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting
URL:
http://ispp.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p511083_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Basuchoudhary, Atin. and Cotting, Dave. "The Political Psychology of Cultural Assimilation: When Evolutionary Game Theory meets a Lay Theory." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting, Bilgi University, Istanbul, Turkey, Jul 09, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p511083_index.html>

APA Citation:

Basuchoudhary, A. and Cotting, D. , 2011-07-09 "The Political Psychology of Cultural Assimilation: When Evolutionary Game Theory meets a Lay Theory." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting, Bilgi University, Istanbul, Turkey Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p511083_index.html

Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An all time high in global migration have brought diverse cultures into close contact – sometimes with disastrous consequences for both the host and immigrant cultures. However, these negative outcomes are not inevitable. We model the fitness of an immigrant population to assimilate into a larger host population as a coordination game in an evolutionary setting. In this game, an immigrant’s benefit for the self is shaped by her lay theory, namely whether one’s cultural identity is perceived as fixed (entity theorist) or malleable (incremental theorist). Identifying with either culture can have an associated affective cost (e.g. shame). Whether a culture of assimilation prevails or not depends on whether a particular cultural identity is fitter than any other. This fitness is a function of the likelihood of interaction among individuals - which determines the aforementioned costs and benefits - chosen randomly from these cultures. We find that assimilation may not be inevitable in liberal democracies even when the net benefits of such assimilation far outweigh the net benefits of retaining an immigrant culture. However, while prejudice might exacerbate this outcome, the repeated interaction propensity between cultures (and therefore the possibility of punishment strategies that encourage assimilation while discouraging retention of immigrant cultures) might lead to greater assimilation and therefore the most favorable outcome for both cultures.


Similar Titles:
Acculturation theories amongst Greek nationals: Examining host majority’s beliefs about the role of the state and of the immigrant groups in dealing with ethno-cultural diversity within the national polity.

Integrating the Theory of Planned Behavior, Altruism, and Self-Construal to Predict Paper Recycling Behavior in Individualistic and Collectivistic Societies: Implications for Communication Campaign Design

Cultural Differences in Game Theory: Proposed Variability of the Individualist and Collectivist in Prisoner's Dilemma


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.