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Interpersonal Cognitive Problem Solving Skills, Future Selves and Hope: Their Role Anti-Social Behaviour in Early Adolescence

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Abstract:

Improving offenders’ interpersonal cognitive problem solving skills (ICPS) remains a popular rehabilitative method across the developed world, despite ambiguous results (McGuire, 2005). Given the social and economic cost of ineffective rehabilitation, it seems worthy of further exploration. Much of the theory behind ICPS was developed from the work of Spivack et al in the 1970s. Some 30 years after the original studies, we re-evaluate their findings that a lack of ICPS skills are related to delinquency in children. Children with varying levels of antisocial behaviour are being tested using Spivack et al’s original tests. Results so far confirm correlations between cognitive deficits and delinquency, though over 40% of those reporting little/no delinquency also demonstrated similar difficulties, supporting the idea that cognitive deficits per se may not be a reliable indicator of delinquency. Therefore, the relevance of ‘Possible Selves Theory’ (Oyserman & Markus, 1990) and ‘Hope Theory’ (Snyder, 2000) is being explored with the same children. We propose that the ‘pathways thinking’ muted in these theories is also utilised for means-end problem solving, for reaching desired future selves and for hopeful thinking. Qualitative data, quantitative data and methodological issues will be presented.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516318_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Wainwright, Lucy. and Nee, Claire. "Interpersonal Cognitive Problem Solving Skills, Future Selves and Hope: Their Role Anti-Social Behaviour in Early Adolescence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516318_index.html>

APA Citation:

Wainwright, L. E. and Nee, C. "Interpersonal Cognitive Problem Solving Skills, Future Selves and Hope: Their Role Anti-Social Behaviour in Early Adolescence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516318_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Improving offenders’ interpersonal cognitive problem solving skills (ICPS) remains a popular rehabilitative method across the developed world, despite ambiguous results (McGuire, 2005). Given the social and economic cost of ineffective rehabilitation, it seems worthy of further exploration. Much of the theory behind ICPS was developed from the work of Spivack et al in the 1970s. Some 30 years after the original studies, we re-evaluate their findings that a lack of ICPS skills are related to delinquency in children. Children with varying levels of antisocial behaviour are being tested using Spivack et al’s original tests. Results so far confirm correlations between cognitive deficits and delinquency, though over 40% of those reporting little/no delinquency also demonstrated similar difficulties, supporting the idea that cognitive deficits per se may not be a reliable indicator of delinquency. Therefore, the relevance of ‘Possible Selves Theory’ (Oyserman & Markus, 1990) and ‘Hope Theory’ (Snyder, 2000) is being explored with the same children. We propose that the ‘pathways thinking’ muted in these theories is also utilised for means-end problem solving, for reaching desired future selves and for hopeful thinking. Qualitative data, quantitative data and methodological issues will be presented.


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