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Predictors of Wrongful Convictions: A Quantitative Analysis of Data from the Criminal Cases Review Commission in the UK

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Abstract:

Research into wrongful convictions and miscarriages of justice normally faces a significant obstacle at its outset—a data deficit. Even the most rigorous analyses of wrongful convictions often suffer from a lack of breadth and depth in their data. This study attempts to overcome these limitations by analyzing data from the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), a public body tasked with investigating all claims of wrongful convictions in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

This paper details an archival analysis of cases from the CCRC in an attempt to identify the causes of wrongful convictions in the UK—or, more specifically, the risk factors that correlate with wrongful convictions. All cases of a single charge of murder sent to the Court of Appeal by the CCRC were coded for a variety of risk factors, and then analyzed statistically to test how strongly these factors correlated with and predicted wrongful convictions. This paper presents the results of this analysis and examines the strongest predictors.

In addition, the paper discusses the benefits and limitations researchers should be aware of when using secondary data from the CCRC and similar organizations, especially when studying wrongful convictions.
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Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516683_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Schmidt, William. "Predictors of Wrongful Convictions: A Quantitative Analysis of Data from the Criminal Cases Review Commission in the UK" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516683_index.html>

APA Citation:

Schmidt, W. M. "Predictors of Wrongful Convictions: A Quantitative Analysis of Data from the Criminal Cases Review Commission in the UK" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516683_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Research into wrongful convictions and miscarriages of justice normally faces a significant obstacle at its outset—a data deficit. Even the most rigorous analyses of wrongful convictions often suffer from a lack of breadth and depth in their data. This study attempts to overcome these limitations by analyzing data from the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), a public body tasked with investigating all claims of wrongful convictions in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

This paper details an archival analysis of cases from the CCRC in an attempt to identify the causes of wrongful convictions in the UK—or, more specifically, the risk factors that correlate with wrongful convictions. All cases of a single charge of murder sent to the Court of Appeal by the CCRC were coded for a variety of risk factors, and then analyzed statistically to test how strongly these factors correlated with and predicted wrongful convictions. This paper presents the results of this analysis and examines the strongest predictors.

In addition, the paper discusses the benefits and limitations researchers should be aware of when using secondary data from the CCRC and similar organizations, especially when studying wrongful convictions.


Similar Titles:
Predicting Wrongful Convictions: A Quantitative, Case-Control Analysis of Risk Factors Using Data from the UK

A Quantitative Analysis of the Effect of Race of Victim on the Collection and Analysis of Forensic DNA Evidence in Criminal Cases

The Legal Boundaries of Madness: An Analysis of the 1953 Canadian Royal Commission on the Law of Insanity As a Defence in Criminal Cases


 
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