Citation

Una Cosa Segura? The Role of Security Technologies in Mexico’s War on Crime

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Security, whether from crime, ecological catastrophe, or illness, has emerged as a central concern of societies across the globe. In response, governments have enrolled technologies—closed-circuit television (CCTV), data mining programs, digital monitoring systems, and so forth—in attempts to manage risk and prevent harms from occurring. In Mexico, President Felipe Calderon has made security the centerpiece of his administration and employed a range of technologies— advanced military weaponry, an integrated, national-level database, biometrics, etc.— in an effort to disrupt the activities of drug cartels and other organized criminals. Using official documents, newspaper articles, and interviews with ordinary people, this paper reviews 3 security programs currently being utilized in Mexico: the National Registry of Mobile Telephone Users (RENAUT), the Citizens Identity Card (CEDI), and the National Vehicle Registry (REPUVE). While data collection on these programs remains ongoing, the paper argues that whereas security technologies function in the global North to ‘own the future’ by predicting risks and preventing harm, these technologies in Mexico are very much tuned to winning the present by identifying extant elements of harm (be they people or things) and working towards their elimination. As well, through the introduction of security technologies, Mexico is witnessing the creation of an advanced technological apparatus, embedded in the heart of the state, that is colonizing governance from an older, more corrupt, and more human state bureaucracy. Despite the dystopic tones that such a project might entail, it is left to determine how ordinary people evaluate and engage with this emergent order.
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions
URL:
http://www.4sonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517614_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Guzik, Keith. "Una Cosa Segura? The Role of Security Technologies in Mexico’s War on Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517614_index.html>

APA Citation:

Guzik, K. "Una Cosa Segura? The Role of Security Technologies in Mexico’s War on Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517614_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Security, whether from crime, ecological catastrophe, or illness, has emerged as a central concern of societies across the globe. In response, governments have enrolled technologies—closed-circuit television (CCTV), data mining programs, digital monitoring systems, and so forth—in attempts to manage risk and prevent harms from occurring. In Mexico, President Felipe Calderon has made security the centerpiece of his administration and employed a range of technologies— advanced military weaponry, an integrated, national-level database, biometrics, etc.— in an effort to disrupt the activities of drug cartels and other organized criminals. Using official documents, newspaper articles, and interviews with ordinary people, this paper reviews 3 security programs currently being utilized in Mexico: the National Registry of Mobile Telephone Users (RENAUT), the Citizens Identity Card (CEDI), and the National Vehicle Registry (REPUVE). While data collection on these programs remains ongoing, the paper argues that whereas security technologies function in the global North to ‘own the future’ by predicting risks and preventing harm, these technologies in Mexico are very much tuned to winning the present by identifying extant elements of harm (be they people or things) and working towards their elimination. As well, through the introduction of security technologies, Mexico is witnessing the creation of an advanced technological apparatus, embedded in the heart of the state, that is colonizing governance from an older, more corrupt, and more human state bureaucracy. Despite the dystopic tones that such a project might entail, it is left to determine how ordinary people evaluate and engage with this emergent order.


Similar Titles:
Security a la Mexicana: Crime, Security, and Emergent Governmentalities in Contemporary Mexico

Una Cosa Segura? Technological Artifacts and the Enforcement of Security in Mexico’s War on Crime

Redefining the Policy Context of Relations between Mexico and the United States. The Role of Security


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.