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When to Use Scott’s π or Krippendorff's α, If Ever?
Unformatted Document Text:  When to Use Scott’s π or Krippendorff's α, If Ever? Page 18 of 36 1d. The other coder draws a marble randomly from the same urn, notes marble’s color, and puts it back into the urn. 1e. If both draw black, each reports positive; if both draw white, each reports negative; in either case they do not look at the object being coded (Assumption 2). Only when one draws a black and the other draws a white will they code objectively, at which point they may honestly agree or disagree, and report accordingly (Assumption 3). 1f. The two coders calculate the average of positive cases and the average of negative cases they’ve reported. If one of the two averages has reached the predetermined quota, they stop random drawing and coding, and report the remaining objects in such a way that both averages meet the quota (Assumption 1). If neither average has reached the quota, they go to Step 1g. 1g. The coders repeat Step 1b and the subsequent steps until all objects are "coded." The three assumptions also portray the following Krippendorff Scenario: 2a. Two coders set a quota for the black and white marbles, decide the total number of marbles (N m ), and fill the urn accordingly (Assumptions 1 and 2). 2b. They take an object to be coded (Assumption 2 b ). 2c. One coder draws a marble randomly from the urn, notes marble’s color, and puts it aside without placing it back into the urn (Assumption 2 b ). 2d. The other coder draws another marble randomly from the same urn, notes marble’s color, and puts it aside without placing it back into the urn (Assumption 2 b ). 2e. If both draw black, each reports positive; if both draw white, each reports negative; in either case they do not look at the object being coded (Assumption 2 b ). Only if one draws a black and the other draws a white will they code the object objectively, at which point they may honestly agree or disagree, and report accordingly (Assumption 3). 2f. The two coders calculate the average of positive cases and the average of negative cases they’ve reported. If one of the two averages has reached the predetermined quota, they stop

Authors: Zhao, XinShu.
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When to Use Scott’s π or Krippendorff's α, If Ever? 
Page 18 of 36 
1d. The other coder draws a marble randomly from the same urn, notes marble’s color, and puts it 
back into the urn. 
1e. If both draw black, each reports positive; if both draw white, each reports negative; in either 
case they do not look at the object being coded (Assumption 2). Only when one draws a black 
and the other draws a white will they code objectively, at which point they may honestly agree 
or disagree, and report accordingly (Assumption 3). 
1f.  The two coders calculate the average of positive cases and the average of negative cases 
they’ve reported.  If one of the two averages has reached the predetermined quota, they stop 
random drawing and coding, and report the remaining objects in such a way that both averages 
meet the quota (Assumption 1). If neither average has reached the quota, they go to Step 1g.  
1g. The coders repeat Step 1b and the subsequent steps until all objects are "coded." 
 
The three assumptions also portray the following Krippendorff Scenario:  
 
2a.  Two coders set a quota for the black and white marbles, decide the total number of marbles 
(N
m
), and fill the urn accordingly (Assumptions 1 and 2).  
2b. They take an object to be coded (Assumption 2
b
).    
2c. One coder draws a marble randomly from the urn, notes marble’s color, and puts it aside 
without placing it back into the urn (Assumption 2
b
). 
2d. The other coder draws another marble randomly from the same urn, notes marble’s color, and 
puts it aside without placing it back into the urn (Assumption 2
b
). 
2e. If both draw black, each reports positive; if both draw white, each reports negative; in either 
case they do not look at the object being coded (Assumption 2
b
).  Only if one draws a black 
and the other draws a white will they code the object objectively, at which point they may 
honestly agree or disagree, and report accordingly (Assumption 3). 
2f.  The two coders calculate the average of positive cases and the average of negative cases 
they’ve reported.  If one of the two averages has reached the predetermined quota, they stop 


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