Citation

IT, the Data Deluge and "Friction": Forms for Info-Sharing versus Methods of Knowledge Production within Global Public Health

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Abstract:

Information is the lifeblood of global public health networks and information technology is its foundational structure. Without access to reliable information, epidemiologists and public health analysts have difficulty "making sense" of uncertainty and risk related to outbreaks. Efforts to increase global transparency and the speed of information-sharing during the post-SARS era have resulted in a plethora of new "forms" of information, products of advances in information technology. Experienced professionals, however, see these newer systems as producing "data" that lacks "context" or semantic information. During outbreaks, epidemiological information is shared both formally and informally via mediums and systems that utilize both "newer" and "older" methods for the aggregation and analysis of data. The result is "information fatigue," a situation in which experts working under the rubric of global public health regularly complain they are both inundated with information and unable to access the much-needed contextual information – or knowledge – that relies upon personal networks or relationships to circulate effectively. Based upon fieldwork conducted within the U.S. CDC throughout the second wave of the pandemic, this paper argues that a subsequent tension – or friction – between ‘local’, ‘old’, and ‘personal’ or ‘global’, ‘new’, and ‘official’ systems of information sharing was never more visible than during the recent 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Expertise in global public health is being shaped by and rearticulated through overlapping, yet distinct, circuits of knowledge production; studies of technology in global health must distinguish between ‘information’ and ‘knowledge’ production and their relationships to local and global forms, methods and processes.
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Association:
Name: 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions
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http://www.4sonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518075_index.html
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MLA Citation:

MacPhail, Theresa. "IT, the Data Deluge and "Friction": Forms for Info-Sharing versus Methods of Knowledge Production within Global Public Health" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH, Nov 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518075_index.html>

APA Citation:

MacPhail, T. , 2011-11-02 "IT, the Data Deluge and "Friction": Forms for Info-Sharing versus Methods of Knowledge Production within Global Public Health" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518075_index.html

Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Information is the lifeblood of global public health networks and information technology is its foundational structure. Without access to reliable information, epidemiologists and public health analysts have difficulty "making sense" of uncertainty and risk related to outbreaks. Efforts to increase global transparency and the speed of information-sharing during the post-SARS era have resulted in a plethora of new "forms" of information, products of advances in information technology. Experienced professionals, however, see these newer systems as producing "data" that lacks "context" or semantic information. During outbreaks, epidemiological information is shared both formally and informally via mediums and systems that utilize both "newer" and "older" methods for the aggregation and analysis of data. The result is "information fatigue," a situation in which experts working under the rubric of global public health regularly complain they are both inundated with information and unable to access the much-needed contextual information – or knowledge – that relies upon personal networks or relationships to circulate effectively. Based upon fieldwork conducted within the U.S. CDC throughout the second wave of the pandemic, this paper argues that a subsequent tension – or friction – between ‘local’, ‘old’, and ‘personal’ or ‘global’, ‘new’, and ‘official’ systems of information sharing was never more visible than during the recent 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Expertise in global public health is being shaped by and rearticulated through overlapping, yet distinct, circuits of knowledge production; studies of technology in global health must distinguish between ‘information’ and ‘knowledge’ production and their relationships to local and global forms, methods and processes.


Similar Titles:
Extending the ReACT Method: Participant-driven Data Analysis and Sustainable Knowledge Products

Toward an Anthropology of Information: New Technologies, Old Methods, and Surveillance in Global Public Health

Global Governance in Intellectual Property and Public Health: Transnational Knowledge Networks in Competition


 
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