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Healthy Aging Innovations: Co-constructing Added-value and Aging users

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Abstract:

Demographic aging challenges current social care and public health systems. The demand on and the costs of health and care will increase significantly. Hence, a transition toward more sustainable health and care systems in aging societies is an issue high on the agenda of policymakers. In this regard, innovation is frequently presented as a panacea that will enable and facilitate a greater focus on self-care, a shift from intramural to extramural care, and an increase of the efficiency of healthcare practices. A somewhat hidden problematique in these discussions is the notion of added-value for aging end-users that is often positioned as crucial to the roll-out of healthcare innovations. User outcomes are multidimensional, including issues of recovery time, compensation for physical limitations, cure, quality of life and well-being. Associated debates, however, often proceed on reductionist assumptions about the relation between technology/innovation and aging. In this paper, we explore how added-value is addressed and co-constructed with forms of user-involvement in a number of healthcare innovation processes. We trace how different dimensions of added-value produce different forms of user involvement and reinforce different assumptions about aging users. We argue that a paternalistic view on aging users, centering on vulnerability and compensation, frequently constrains possible transition paths to more sustainable health and care systems. We delve into a number of STS insights on users and user involvement and explore the potential to inform innovation processes that incorporate a more balanced perspective on adding value for aging users.
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Association:
Name: 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions
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http://www.4sonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518261_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Peine, Alexander. and Moors, Ellen. "Healthy Aging Innovations: Co-constructing Added-value and Aging users" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH, Nov 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518261_index.html>

APA Citation:

Peine, A. and Moors, E. , 2011-11-02 "Healthy Aging Innovations: Co-constructing Added-value and Aging users" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518261_index.html

Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Demographic aging challenges current social care and public health systems. The demand on and the costs of health and care will increase significantly. Hence, a transition toward more sustainable health and care systems in aging societies is an issue high on the agenda of policymakers. In this regard, innovation is frequently presented as a panacea that will enable and facilitate a greater focus on self-care, a shift from intramural to extramural care, and an increase of the efficiency of healthcare practices. A somewhat hidden problematique in these discussions is the notion of added-value for aging end-users that is often positioned as crucial to the roll-out of healthcare innovations. User outcomes are multidimensional, including issues of recovery time, compensation for physical limitations, cure, quality of life and well-being. Associated debates, however, often proceed on reductionist assumptions about the relation between technology/innovation and aging. In this paper, we explore how added-value is addressed and co-constructed with forms of user-involvement in a number of healthcare innovation processes. We trace how different dimensions of added-value produce different forms of user involvement and reinforce different assumptions about aging users. We argue that a paternalistic view on aging users, centering on vulnerability and compensation, frequently constrains possible transition paths to more sustainable health and care systems. We delve into a number of STS insights on users and user involvement and explore the potential to inform innovation processes that incorporate a more balanced perspective on adding value for aging users.


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