Citation

Colonial education displays and the construction of "Good" Filipinos at two international expositions (1887 & 1904)

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, colonial states were
preoccupied with creating hierarchical systems according to race and
social status in their colonies (see Stoler, 2010). Or, as Rafael
(1990) colorfully states, colonial states were “dynastic states in
drag,” creating a hierarchical and segregated colonial society under
the guise of an education-based “civilizing mission.” International
expositions proved prime venues for colonial states to display the
civilizing missions / education efforts in their colonies
(Morillo-Alicea, 2005), and also display the ways in which they
organized the people therein (i.e., their colonial projects). This
paper examines the colonial education efforts of both Spain and the
United States in the Philippines, as displayed at the 1887 Philippine
Exposition in Madrid and the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St.
Louis, respectively. Spain and the United States both desired to put
their colonial efforts on display, and in the best light possible.
Both countries were facing criticism at home for their colonial
projects, and utilized expositions as an opportunity to sway public
opinion, display their colonial education efforts in a carefully
arranged and calculated way, and provide a controlled environment for
encounter. Fairgoers encountered their nation’s colonial project and
subjects, and those on display encountered their colonizers on a new,
more intimate level as well—but only in the ways exposition organizers
wished. These experiences of encounter left a lasting impression on
all involved (Rydell, 1987), and helped to shape future colonial
education efforts in the Philippines.
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518611_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Hardacker, Erin. "Colonial education displays and the construction of "Good" Filipinos at two international expositions (1887 & 1904)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518611_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hardacker, E. P. "Colonial education displays and the construction of "Good" Filipinos at two international expositions (1887 & 1904)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518611_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, colonial states were
preoccupied with creating hierarchical systems according to race and
social status in their colonies (see Stoler, 2010). Or, as Rafael
(1990) colorfully states, colonial states were “dynastic states in
drag,” creating a hierarchical and segregated colonial society under
the guise of an education-based “civilizing mission.” International
expositions proved prime venues for colonial states to display the
civilizing missions / education efforts in their colonies
(Morillo-Alicea, 2005), and also display the ways in which they
organized the people therein (i.e., their colonial projects). This
paper examines the colonial education efforts of both Spain and the
United States in the Philippines, as displayed at the 1887 Philippine
Exposition in Madrid and the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St.
Louis, respectively. Spain and the United States both desired to put
their colonial efforts on display, and in the best light possible.
Both countries were facing criticism at home for their colonial
projects, and utilized expositions as an opportunity to sway public
opinion, display their colonial education efforts in a carefully
arranged and calculated way, and provide a controlled environment for
encounter. Fairgoers encountered their nation’s colonial project and
subjects, and those on display encountered their colonizers on a new,
more intimate level as well—but only in the ways exposition organizers
wished. These experiences of encounter left a lasting impression on
all involved (Rydell, 1987), and helped to shape future colonial
education efforts in the Philippines.


Similar Titles:
World Society and the Construction of the International System: Ornamentalism, Colonialism and the Case of Siam

Engineering identity construction among American domestic and Indian international engineering students in U.S. higher education: A comparative analysis


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.