All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

“Our TV show”: Legitimacy, Public Relations and J. Edgar Hoover’s “The F.B.I.” on ABC-TV
Unformatted Document Text:  Cecil  —  “Our  TV  show”    —    13   affiliated with the program. According to DeLoach’s notes from the meeting, Hoover told Zimbalist the checks were necessary because, “the communists constantly try to infiltrate the FBI. … The Director additionally stressed the necessity of the FBI checking scripts before the program was put on film or placed on the air.” 51 In the absence of any agreement spelling out the relationship between the FBI and the production team, the Bureau exerted absolute control over storylines, stage directions and dialog contained in the scripts. Every script submitted by Martin’s production company was edited line- by-line by an FBI agent in the Crime Records Division. The script for the series’ first episode, “The Monster,” for example, focused on a fictional villain who strangled women with their own hair. Hoover’s closest confidante, Associate Director Tolson, rejected the script: “This is a very bad script — Too many murders. I can’t approve it.” 52 The FBI made it clear early in the first season that it was dissatisfied with the quality of the scripts being provided by Warner Brothers writers. “I told [Warner Bros. Executive Vice President Benjamin] Kalmenson I realized the end product had to be one of entertainment rather than a dry documentary of institutionalization,” DeLoach wrote in a memorandum to John P. Mohr. “However, despite this fact, the program should not be cheap and tawdry, neither should it confuse the American public as to the jurisdiction of the FBI.” 53 From episode one through episode 241 nine years later, FBI editors painstakingly rewrote scripts and created memoranda detailing the suggested changes. Often, changes involved simple procedures, removing references to ostensibly secret law enforcement techniques like black-bag jobs, wiretaps and surreptitious electronic monitoring. Those techniques might suggest something other than a restrained, responsible FBI. Beyond that, though, FBI editors changed dialog, altered storylines and sometimes speculated about the dramatic value of a given scene. FBI officials could not understand why writers and producers, who were given copies of

Authors: Cecil, Matthew.
first   previous   Page 13 of 30   next   last



background image
Cecil  —  “Our  TV  show”    —    13  
affiliated with the program. According to DeLoach’s notes from the meeting, Hoover told 
Zimbalist the checks were necessary because, “the communists constantly try to infiltrate the FBI. 
… The Director additionally stressed the necessity of the FBI checking scripts before the program 
was put on film or placed on the air.”
51
 
In the absence of any agreement spelling out the relationship between the FBI and the 
production team, the Bureau exerted absolute control over storylines, stage directions and dialog 
contained in the scripts. Every script submitted by Martin’s production company was edited line-
by-line by an FBI agent in the Crime Records Division. The script for the series’ first episode, 
“The Monster,” for example, focused on a fictional villain who strangled women with their own 
hair. Hoover’s closest confidante, Associate Director Tolson, rejected the script: “This is a very 
bad script — Too many murders. I can’t approve it.”
52
 
The FBI made it clear early in the first season that it was dissatisfied with the quality of 
the scripts being provided by Warner Brothers writers. “I told [Warner Bros. Executive Vice 
President Benjamin] Kalmenson I realized the end product had to be one of entertainment rather 
than a dry documentary of institutionalization,” DeLoach wrote in a memorandum to John P. 
Mohr. “However, despite this fact, the program should not be cheap and tawdry, neither should 
it confuse the American public as to the jurisdiction of the FBI.”
53
  
From episode one through episode 241 nine years later, FBI editors painstakingly rewrote 
scripts and created memoranda detailing the suggested changes. Often, changes involved simple 
procedures, removing references to ostensibly secret law enforcement techniques like black-bag 
jobs, wiretaps and surreptitious electronic monitoring. Those techniques might suggest 
something other than a restrained, responsible FBI. Beyond that, though, FBI editors changed 
dialog, altered storylines and sometimes speculated about the dramatic value of a given scene. 
FBI officials could not understand why writers and producers, who were given copies of 


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.