All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Science, Restraint, and J. Edgar Hoover: Building and Maintaining the FBI Brand, 1933 to 1972
Unformatted Document Text:  Cecil,  Tiernan,  Koroglu  —  Science,  Restraint,  and  J.  Edgar  Hoover    —   12   Creating the FBI Brand Bureau officials were, in some ways, reluctantly drawn into a culture of branding by events outside of their control. FBI historians have identified several instances in the early 1930s where Hoover found public perceptions of his agency’s being appropriated and shaped by outsiders. Some of those media and entertainment portrayals carried the potential for undermining the legitimacy of the Bureau. When Hollywood motion pictures began portraying FBI agents as classic detective action heroes, for example, Hoover engaged writers Courtney Ryley Cooper and Rex Collier to craft a more dispassionate, scientific public relations template for the Bureau. Rather than sometimes violent and brash individuals, the magazine stories, books and radio scripts Cooper created portrayed the FBI as a faceless, nameless team of steady, well-educated agents who clinically employed the law and science to catch criminals. Born in Kansas City in 1881, Cooper was an unlikely adjunct “G-Man.” He ran away from home at age 16 and became a circus clown and then a publicist for Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show. He moved into circus management and dabbled in press agentry before leaving the circus to become a newspaper reporter, writing features for the Kansas City Star, New York World, Denver Post, and Chicago Tribune. xxxvii In 1933, Cooper began writing crime stories, churning out 750 circus-themed stories and winning an O. Henry Award in 1930 for the trite morality tale, “The Elephant Forgets.” xxxviii Over the course of seven years, Cooper authored 24 magazine articles, a half dozen movie and radio scripts and four books, all sharing themes that came to define the FBI brand for millions of Americans.

Authors: Cecil, Matthew., Tiernan, Jennifer. and Koroglu, Didem.
first   previous   Page 12 of 28   next   last



background image
Cecil,  Tiernan,  Koroglu  —  Science,  Restraint,  and  J.  Edgar  Hoover    —   12  
 
Creating the FBI Brand 
 
Bureau officials were, in some ways, reluctantly drawn into a culture of branding 
by events outside of their control. FBI historians have identified several instances in the 
early 1930s where Hoover found public perceptions of his agency’s being appropriated 
and shaped by outsiders. Some of those media and entertainment portrayals carried the 
potential for undermining the legitimacy of the Bureau. When Hollywood motion 
pictures began portraying FBI agents as classic detective action heroes, for example, 
Hoover engaged writers Courtney Ryley Cooper and Rex Collier to craft a more 
dispassionate, scientific public relations template for the Bureau. Rather than sometimes 
violent and brash individuals, the magazine stories, books and radio scripts Cooper 
created portrayed the FBI as a faceless, nameless team of steady, well-educated agents 
who clinically employed the law and science to catch criminals. 
Born in Kansas City in 1881, Cooper was an unlikely adjunct “G-Man.” He ran away 
from home at age 16 and became a circus clown and then a publicist for Buffalo Bill 
Cody’s Wild West Show. He moved into circus management and dabbled in press agentry 
before leaving the circus to become a newspaper reporter, writing features for the Kansas 
City Star, New York World, Denver Post, and Chicago Tribune.
xxxvii
 In 1933, Cooper began 
writing crime stories, churning out 750 circus-themed stories and winning an O. Henry 
Award in 1930 for the trite morality tale, “The Elephant Forgets.”
xxxviii
 Over the course of 
seven years, Cooper authored 24 magazine articles, a half dozen movie and radio scripts 
and four books, all sharing themes that came to define the FBI brand for millions of 
Americans. 


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 12 of 28   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.