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Science, Restraint, and J. Edgar Hoover: Building and Maintaining the FBI Brand, 1933 to 1972
Unformatted Document Text:  Cecil,  Tiernan,  Koroglu  —  Science,  Restraint,  and  J.  Edgar  Hoover    —   7   tobacco companies used hot irons to “brand” wooden boxes or palettes of tobacco in the 1800s. xviii In the early and mid-1800s, regional manufacturers of patent medications were the first to brand their products with specific names or symbols. xix In the 1880s and 1890s, organizations began to use mass media to promote their products nationally, helping create a national culture of consumption. Prior to that period, according to Julianne Sivulka, consumers thought of products in terms of their generic categories like soap, rather than in terms of a specific product like Ivory Soap. xx As locally produced products were replaced by factory manufactured goods during the last half of the 19th century and the early decades of the 20th century, brand labels and packaging became commonplace. Consumers first saw labeled goods as luxuries, enhancing the brand appeal. Quaker had significant success with its branding of Quaker Oats. Quaker initially sold and marketed its oats in small glass jars or bulk bags from which grocers sold portions to customers. In the mid-19th century, oatmeal was considered a food for invalids and Scottish immigrants (Sivulka, 49). To create more appeal for its product, Quaker began packaging its oats in small cardboard boxes printed with the Quaker Man logo. Next, Quaker used mass media such as newspapers, magazines and billboards to advertise on a national level. In just a few years, the Quaker Man was a nationally recognized logo and a generic breakfast food had a broader appeal. As more manufacturers used branding to enhance the appeal and sales of their products, the development of brands and brand identity created public connections with certain products. The development of brand identity could instill confidence in consumers regarding the function or claims of a product. Consumers might choose one

Authors: Cecil, Matthew., Tiernan, Jennifer. and Koroglu, Didem.
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Cecil,  Tiernan,  Koroglu  —  Science,  Restraint,  and  J.  Edgar  Hoover    —   7  
tobacco companies used hot irons to “brand” wooden boxes or palettes of tobacco in the 
1800s.
xviii
  
In the early and mid-1800s, regional manufacturers of patent medications were 
the first to brand their products with specific names or symbols.
xix
 In the 1880s and 1890s, 
organizations began to use mass media to promote their products nationally, helping 
create a national culture of consumption. Prior to that period, according to Julianne 
Sivulka, consumers thought of products in terms of their generic categories like soap, 
rather than in terms of a specific product like Ivory Soap.
xx
 As locally produced products 
were replaced by factory manufactured goods during the last half of the 19th century and 
the early decades of the 20th century, brand labels and packaging became commonplace. 
Consumers first saw labeled goods as luxuries, enhancing the brand appeal. 
Quaker had significant success with its branding of Quaker Oats. Quaker initially 
sold and marketed its oats in small glass jars or bulk bags from which grocers sold 
portions to customers. In the mid-19th century, oatmeal was considered a food for 
invalids and Scottish immigrants (Sivulka, 49). To create more appeal for its product, 
Quaker began packaging its oats in small cardboard boxes printed with the Quaker Man 
logo. Next, Quaker used mass media such as newspapers, magazines and billboards to 
advertise on a national level. In just a few years, the Quaker Man was a nationally 
recognized logo and a generic breakfast food had a broader appeal. 
As more manufacturers used branding to enhance the appeal and sales of their 
products, the development of brands and brand identity created public connections with 
certain products. The development of brand identity could instill confidence in 
consumers regarding the function or claims of a product. Consumers might choose one 


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