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Journalism as a viable career choice: What guidance counselors are telling students
Unformatted Document Text:  15Journalism as a viable career SD = 1.18; M=3.58, SD=1.05). They were less decisive with how the media portray the future of magazines with 51% of the respondents responding “neutral” (M=2.89, SD=.90) When asked if they thought that the media portrayed journalism as an industry in decline, responses were mixed. About 55% of the counselors were unsure, while 26% said “yes” and 19% said “no.” When specifically asked about media stories on the decline of newspapers, 35% of the counselors said that these stories had little influence on their recommendation of a journalism career. Another 32% said they were unsure and 19% said that negative stories about the decline of newspapers did influence their recommendation to advise against a journalism career (M=2.52, SD=1.15). Likeliness to recommend journalism career Guidance counselors were asked to reflect on what they would tell journalism students who came to them seeking a recommendation about a journalism career. About half of the guidance counselors (49%) said that they would recommend a journalism career. Another 44% said they were unsure, and only 5% would recommend avoiding a journalism career (M=3.63, SD=.858). Interestingly, these counselors perceived their peers as less likely to recommend a journalism career to their advisees. They indicated that only 26% would likely recommend journalism careers and thought almost 18% would not. The majority (53%), however, were unsure what their colleagues would recommend (M=3.16, SD=.877). Using a scale of 1 (very unlikely) to 5 (very likely), counselors also were asked what they thought students’ attitudes were about pursuing a journalism career. The data show that counselors think students are more unlikely to pursue a journalism career today or one year ago than they were five years ago. Specifically, they reported that about 30%

Authors: Rentner, Terry., Oyer, Seth. and Flynn, Mark.
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Journalism as a viable career
SD = 1.18; M=3.58, SD=1.05).  They were less decisive with how the media portray the 
future of magazines with 51% of the respondents responding “neutral” (M=2.89, SD=.90) 
When asked if they thought that the media portrayed journalism as an industry in 
decline, responses were mixed.  About 55% of the counselors were unsure, while 26% 
said “yes” and 19% said “no.”  When specifically asked about media stories on the 
decline of newspapers, 35% of the counselors said that these stories had little influence 
on their recommendation of a journalism career.  Another 32% said they were unsure and 
19% said that negative stories about the decline of newspapers did influence their 
recommendation to advise against a journalism career (M=2.52, SD=1.15).
Likeliness to recommend journalism career
Guidance counselors were asked to reflect on what they would tell journalism 
students who came to them seeking a recommendation about a journalism career. About 
half of the guidance counselors (49%) said that they would recommend a journalism 
career.  Another 44% said they were unsure, and only 5% would recommend avoiding a 
journalism career (M=3.63, SD=.858). Interestingly, these counselors perceived their 
peers as less likely to recommend a journalism career to their advisees.   They indicated 
that only 26% would likely recommend journalism careers and thought almost 18% 
would not.  The majority (53%), however, were unsure what their colleagues would 
recommend (M=3.16, SD=.877).
Using a scale of 1 (very unlikely) to 5 (very likely), counselors also were asked 
what they thought students’ attitudes were about pursuing a journalism career.  The data 
show that counselors think students are more unlikely to pursue a journalism career today 
or one year ago than they were five years ago.  Specifically, they reported that about 30% 


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