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Soap operas as a matchmaker: A cultivation analysis of the effects of South Korean TV dramas’ on Vietnamese women’s marital intentions
Unformatted Document Text:  SOAP OPERAS AS A MATCHMAKER 10   also detected cultivation effects on audiences in other market. For example, Weimann (1984) tested the theory in Israel and discovered that heavy viewers had a stronger belief in the U.S.’s wealth and high standard of living than light viewers. Kang & Morgan (1990) found that exposure to American television programs correlated with more liberal attitudes toward sex roles and family values among South Korean female viewers. Cheung & Chan (1996) investigated Hong Kong adolescents’ perception of the mean world. From Asia, Tan & Suarchavarat (1988) investigated Thai spectators’ stereotypes of the United States. These studies suggest that more cultivation research in a cross- cultural context is in order. Another development in the use of the theory is that while early cultivation studies focused on the effects of all television programs, media scholars later began to examine the effects of specific genres such as soap operas or news (Buerkel-Rothfuss & Mayes; 1981, Segrin & Nabi, 2002; Romer, Jamieson, & Aday, 2003). For example, Gerbner, Gross, Signorielli, & Morgan (1980) explored the misrepresentation of elderly people in TV dramas. Segrin & Nabi (2002) found an association between watching romantically themed programming, including soap operas, and viewers’ unrealistic marital expectations. Cultivation analysis has drawn criticism of its methodological and conceptual aspects from mass communication scholars, especially about its disregard of audiences’ differences in their demographic aspects (Doob & MacDonald, 1979). For instance, Hughes (1980) found that less educated people tend to accept the television’s social reality more than well educated ones. He argued that demographic variables such as race and education should be included to make the argument for cultivation a sound one. Another missing piece in cultivation analysis is the effects on audience behavior. This weakness calls in for a combination of cultivation with other social theories in order to predict changes in audience behaviors.

Authors: Vu, Hong.
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SOAP OPERAS AS A MATCHMAKER 
10 
 
also detected cultivation effects on audiences in other market. For example, Weimann (1984) 
tested the theory in Israel and discovered that heavy viewers had a stronger belief in the U.S.’s wealth 
and high standard of living than light viewers. Kang & Morgan (1990) found that exposure to 
American television programs correlated with more liberal attitudes toward sex roles and family values 
among South Korean female viewers. Cheung & Chan (1996) investigated Hong Kong adolescents’ 
perception of the mean world. From Asia, Tan & Suarchavarat (1988) investigated Thai spectators’ 
stereotypes of the United States. These studies suggest that more cultivation research in a cross-
cultural context is in order.  
Another development in the use of the theory is that while early cultivation studies focused 
on the effects of all television programs, media scholars later began to examine the effects of 
specific genres such as soap operas or news (Buerkel-Rothfuss & Mayes; 1981, Segrin & Nabi, 
2002; Romer, Jamieson, & Aday, 2003). For example, Gerbner, Gross, Signorielli, & Morgan 
(1980) explored the misrepresentation of elderly people in TV dramas. Segrin & Nabi (2002) 
found an association between watching romantically themed programming, including soap 
operas, and viewers’ unrealistic marital expectations.  
Cultivation analysis has drawn criticism of its methodological and conceptual aspects from 
mass communication scholars, especially about its disregard of audiences’ differences in their 
demographic aspects (Doob & MacDonald, 1979). For instance, Hughes (1980) found that less educated 
people tend to accept the television’s social reality more than well educated ones. He argued that 
demographic variables such as race and education should be included to make the argument for 
cultivation a sound one. Another missing piece in cultivation analysis is the effects on audience behavior. 
This weakness calls in for a combination of cultivation with other social theories in order to predict 
changes in audience behaviors. 


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