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Genealogy of Japan’s Nuclear Affairs: A Trans-Pacific Cultural Critique

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Abstract:

In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi Plant’s nuclear emergency Prime Minister Kan Naoto referred to the possibility of drastically revising Japan’s energy policy. In Japan and elsewhere, the Fukushima crisis appears to have triggered a global epistemic shift that could potentially cast fundamental challenges to the international nuclear conglomeration. This paper examines the trajectories of the nuclear perceptions in Japan but from a critical trans-Pacific perspective. As a turn of the twentieth century imperial power, Japan has pursued prosperity and progress through the promotion of science and technology, including the nuclear research. While the U.S. nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki gave rise to what might be called the “anti-nuclear ethics,” which ran deep among the anti-Cold War, anti-corporate, feminist, and often anti-American oppositional politics, such cultural texts as the children’s animation, known in the United States as “Astro Boy” and immensely popular in Japan during the 1950s and 60s, effectively disseminated the biopolitical image of the nuclear energy as friendly, helpful, even adorable. Moreover, many aspiring scholars emigrated from Asia to become nuclear scientists in the United States. It was in the context of such Cold War trans-Pacific love affairs between Asia and the United States that the General Electric built Fukushima Daiichi Plant’s “Mark 1” reactor. Through disentangling these and other trajectories, the paper delineates a genealogy of nuclear epistemologies in Japan in its inseparable structural ties to the United States.
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Name: 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions
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http://www.4sonline.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519721_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Yoneyama, Lisa. "Genealogy of Japan’s Nuclear Affairs: A Trans-Pacific Cultural Critique" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH, <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519721_index.html>

APA Citation:

Yoneyama, L. "Genealogy of Japan’s Nuclear Affairs: A Trans-Pacific Cultural Critique" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519721_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi Plant’s nuclear emergency Prime Minister Kan Naoto referred to the possibility of drastically revising Japan’s energy policy. In Japan and elsewhere, the Fukushima crisis appears to have triggered a global epistemic shift that could potentially cast fundamental challenges to the international nuclear conglomeration. This paper examines the trajectories of the nuclear perceptions in Japan but from a critical trans-Pacific perspective. As a turn of the twentieth century imperial power, Japan has pursued prosperity and progress through the promotion of science and technology, including the nuclear research. While the U.S. nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki gave rise to what might be called the “anti-nuclear ethics,” which ran deep among the anti-Cold War, anti-corporate, feminist, and often anti-American oppositional politics, such cultural texts as the children’s animation, known in the United States as “Astro Boy” and immensely popular in Japan during the 1950s and 60s, effectively disseminated the biopolitical image of the nuclear energy as friendly, helpful, even adorable. Moreover, many aspiring scholars emigrated from Asia to become nuclear scientists in the United States. It was in the context of such Cold War trans-Pacific love affairs between Asia and the United States that the General Electric built Fukushima Daiichi Plant’s “Mark 1” reactor. Through disentangling these and other trajectories, the paper delineates a genealogy of nuclear epistemologies in Japan in its inseparable structural ties to the United States.


Similar Titles:
Trans-Pacific Discourse of Race: The Journal of Race Development and U.S.-Japan Fraternity, 1911-1920

Nuclear Imagery and Cultural Meanings of the Atomic Bomb in the Occupied Japan

Communication Pedagogy and Problems of Militarism: A Trans-Pacific Critique

Fragments of the Trans-Pacific Cultural Front: Agnes Smedley and Lu Xun in Shanghai, 1930-1934


 
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