Citation

Gender and Racial Source Bias in Sports Illustrated Kids, 2000-2009

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Most studies of daily news reports have found evidence of substantial source bias, especially in the form of heavy reliance on European male societal elites for information (Brown, Bybee, Wearden, & Straughan, 1987; Hackett, 1985; Lasorsa & Reese, 1990). Source bias refers to the extent that journalists seek information from particular groups, which results in a limited range of perspectives and opinions about the news item or event. Such bias exists when people holding different points of view have limited or no opportunity to express those views or become part of the news process (Gans, 1979; Lee & Solomon, 1990; Sigal, 1973). This study conducted a content analysis of sources in feature articles (N=315) in Sports Illustrated Kids to determine whether the sources reflect actual participation rates in athletic competition based on gender and race. This study found that women continue to be vastly underrepresented within the magazine’s pages as dominant subjects and sources. Articles using men as sources vastly outnumber those using women as sources by a ratio of more than 5 to 1 (84.1% to 15.9%). Only 21.1% of feature articles were stories for which the dominant subject(s) were female athletes or female-specific sports teams, whereas men accounted for 78.9%. As far as a racial difference, only 30.9% of articles featured racial minority athletes as the dominant subject.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

0 (255), 1 (227), sourc (177), sport (113), women (105), men (93), articl (73), european (66), gender (65), athlet (63), african (61), 2 (53), 3 (50), race (46), illustr (45), use (40), kid (39), domin (38), subject (38), femal (35), 4 (35),
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519925_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Furrow, Ashley. "Gender and Racial Source Bias in Sports Illustrated Kids, 2000-2009" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519925_index.html>

APA Citation:

Furrow, A. , 2011-08-10 "Gender and Racial Source Bias in Sports Illustrated Kids, 2000-2009" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO Online <PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519925_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most studies of daily news reports have found evidence of substantial source bias, especially in the form of heavy reliance on European male societal elites for information (Brown, Bybee, Wearden, & Straughan, 1987; Hackett, 1985; Lasorsa & Reese, 1990). Source bias refers to the extent that journalists seek information from particular groups, which results in a limited range of perspectives and opinions about the news item or event. Such bias exists when people holding different points of view have limited or no opportunity to express those views or become part of the news process (Gans, 1979; Lee & Solomon, 1990; Sigal, 1973). This study conducted a content analysis of sources in feature articles (N=315) in Sports Illustrated Kids to determine whether the sources reflect actual participation rates in athletic competition based on gender and race. This study found that women continue to be vastly underrepresented within the magazine’s pages as dominant subjects and sources. Articles using men as sources vastly outnumber those using women as sources by a ratio of more than 5 to 1 (84.1% to 15.9%). Only 21.1% of feature articles were stories for which the dominant subject(s) were female athletes or female-specific sports teams, whereas men accounted for 78.9%. As far as a racial difference, only 30.9% of articles featured racial minority athletes as the dominant subject.


Similar Titles:
The Gendered World of Sports: An Analysis of Sports Illustrated for Women and Sports Illustrated

Expanding Categorization at the Intersection of Race and Gender: "Women of Color" as a Political Category for African American, Latina, Asian American, and American Indian Women


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.