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Understanding Support for Internet Censorship in China: An Elaboration of the Theory of Reasoned Action
Unformatted Document Text:  RUNNING HEAD: Understanding Support for Internet Censorship in China 22 For the overall TRA model, the relationship between intention and subjective norms was not significant (β = -.021, n.s.), although it was between intention and attitude (β = 1.154 p < .05). This notwithstanding, the relationship between normative belief and subjective norms was significant (β = 1.316, p < .001). However, the relationships between motivation to comply, the interaction of normative belief and motivation, and subjective norms were not. The logistic regression results showed that a significant relationship between intention and behavior (β = -.346, p < .001). This means that each unit of increase in the intention to support censorship will lead to the log-odds of not supporting blocking the website to drop by .346. In other words, people were more likely to support blocking in actual behavior, when they expressed strong intention to do so. Attitude was significantly predicted by beliefs and the interaction of beliefs and evaluations about the censorship (β = .334, p < .01; β = .025; p < .01), but not by evaluation of the belief (β = .109, n.s.). Hypothesis 1 was supported and hypothesis 2 was not 3 . ---------------------- Table 2 about here ----------------------- As to the right-wing authoritarian personality, the two dimensions contributed to the model differently. The relationships between aggressive personality and intention was not significant, whereas submissive personality was significantly related to attitude (β=1.99, p < .001). The more submissive subjects were, the more affirmative they were towards censorship. Hypothesis 3 was partially supported. 3 With MLR estimation, both the indirection effect estimation with the delta method (Baron & Kenny, 1986; Sobel, 1982) and the bootstrap procedure (Muthén & Muthén, 2010; Preacher & Hayes, 2008) are not available in Mplus. Therefore, the mediation effects were not reported.

Authors: Feng, Guangchao.
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RUNNING HEAD: Understanding Support for Internet Censorship in China 
22
For the overall TRA model, the relationship between intention and subjective 
norms was not significant (β = -.021, n.s.), although it was between intention and 
attitude (β = 1.154 p < .05). This notwithstanding, the relationship between normative 
belief and subjective norms was significant (β = 1.316, p < .001). However, the 
relationships between motivation to comply, the interaction of normative belief and 
motivation, and subjective norms were not. The logistic regression results showed that 
a significant relationship between intention and behavior (β = -.346, p < .001). This 
means that each unit of increase in the intention to support censorship will lead to the 
log-odds of not supporting blocking the website to drop by .346. In other words, 
people were more likely to support blocking in actual behavior, when they expressed 
strong intention to do so. Attitude was significantly predicted by beliefs and the 
interaction of beliefs and evaluations about the censorship (β = .334, p < .01; β = .025; 
p < .01), but not by evaluation of the belief (β = .109, n.s.). Hypothesis 1 was 
---------------------- 
Table 2 about here 
----------------------- 
As to the right-wing authoritarian personality, the two dimensions contributed to 
the model differently. The relationships between aggressive personality and intention 
was not significant, whereas submissive personality was significantly related to 
attitude (β=1.99, p < .001). The more submissive subjects were, the more affirmative 
they were towards censorship. Hypothesis 3 was partially supported. 
                                                        
3
  With MLR estimation, both the indirection effect estimation with the delta method (Baron & Kenny, 1986; Sobel, 


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