All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

HIV Stigmatization and Stereotyping in Chinese News Coverage: From a Framing Perspective
Unformatted Document Text:  HIV STIMGATIZATION AND STEROTYPING 6     is also associated with the degree of social approval of how a disease is transmitted. If the behaviors associated with the transmission of HIV/AIDS are perceived as deviant and evoke social disapproval, strong responsibility and blame will be placed on the individuals producing those behaviors. For example, an individual who contracts HIV/AIDS through intravenous drug use, prostitution, promiscuity, or homosexuality may be perceived as morally responsible for their disease. In contrast, an individual who contracts the disease through a blood transfusion may be perceived as a victim of injustice. Research indicates individuals who contract HIV through behaviors that are socially sanctioned will be attached with a double stigma (Novick, 1997). Responsibility attribution facilitates the release, promotion, maintenance and perpetuation of HIV stigmatization. Crandall (2000) utilizes justification ideology to explain why people tolerate stigmatization. Justification ideology includes the attributional approach and the hierarchical approach. The attributional approach focuses on internal controllability and attributions that make a stigmatized person responsible for his/her stigma. In parallel with the attributional approach, the hierarchical approach endorses the hierarchy among groups of people and reinforces collective control of one group over another. People believe PLWHA are responsible for their HIV status and deserve the consequences associated with the disease. The hierarchal approach of justification ideology provides cognitive and emotional cover for HIV stigmatization, and allows people to excuse discrimination and isolation of an entire group of individuals. In the long term, this type of stigmatization helps create a social hierarchy and reinforces social inequality at the societal, institutional and policy level (Parker and Aggleton, 2002).

Authors: Ren, Chunbo., Hust, Stacey., Zhang, Peng. and Zhao, Yunze.
first   previous   Page 6 of 23   next   last



background image
HIV STIMGATIZATION AND STEROTYPING                                                                     6
 
 
is also associated with the degree of social approval of how a disease is transmitted. If the 
behaviors associated with the transmission of HIV/AIDS are perceived as deviant and evoke 
social disapproval, strong responsibility and blame will be placed on the individuals producing 
those behaviors.  For example, an individual who contracts HIV/AIDS through intravenous 
drug use, prostitution, promiscuity, or homosexuality may be perceived as morally responsible 
for their disease.  In contrast, an individual who contracts the disease through a blood 
transfusion may be perceived as a victim of injustice. Research indicates individuals who 
contract HIV through behaviors that are socially sanctioned will be attached with a double 
stigma (Novick, 1997).  
Responsibility attribution facilitates the release, promotion, maintenance and 
perpetuation of HIV stigmatization. Crandall (2000) utilizes justification ideology to explain 
why people tolerate stigmatization. Justification ideology includes the attributional approach 
and the hierarchical approach.  The attributional approach focuses on internal controllability 
and attributions that make a stigmatized person responsible for his/her stigma. In parallel with 
the attributional approach, the hierarchical approach endorses the hierarchy among groups of 
people and reinforces collective control of one group over another. People believe PLWHA are 
responsible for their HIV status and deserve the consequences associated with the disease.  The 
hierarchal approach of justification ideology provides cognitive and emotional cover for HIV 
stigmatization, and allows people to excuse discrimination and isolation of an entire group of 
individuals.   In the long term, this type of stigmatization helps create a social hierarchy and 
reinforces social inequality at the societal, institutional and policy level (Parker and Aggleton, 
2002). 
 


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 23   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.