All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

HIV Stigmatization and Stereotyping in Chinese News Coverage: From a Framing Perspective
Unformatted Document Text:  HIV STIMGATIZATION AND STEROTYPING 7     HIV Stigmatization and Stereotyping Stereotypes are traits or simplified mental pictures that we form when we think about a particular social group (Lippmann, 1922; Dovidio, 1999). Accordingly, stereotyping is a process by which people use social categories in recalling and processing information about others (Dovidio, 1999). Stereotyping is considered an unjustified and inaccurate process due to overgeneralization (Brigham, 1971). Stereotyping and stigmatization are highly related processes in most cases (Biernat & Dovidio, 2000). Stereotyping influences how people think about others (heuristic cue to recall) and feel about others (negative attitudes and prejudice). Stereotypes can also exert influence on people’s discriminatory behavior (Dovidio et al., 1996). Stereotyping is highly integrated into HIV/AIDS stigmatization. They both involve the recognition of a “mark” that signifies group membership from the perceiver’s perspective (Biernat & Dovidio, 2000). Furthermore, stigma is associated with a stereotype when responsibility attribution is salient. To the extent that people are viewed as responsible for their stigma, a negative stereotype is likely to develop toward the particular social group (Biernat & Dovidio, 2000). With responsibility attribution, stereotyping can play a central role in the development, justification, enhancement and consolidation of stigmatization (Biernat & Dovidio, 2000). The conceptualization of stigma proposed by Link and Phelan (2001) well explains the association and integration of group stereotyping and HIV stigmatization. In their conceptualization, stigma includes a label and a stereotype. First, people differentiate PLWHA and label them as different from the norm (e.g. AIDS girl, AIDS mother). Second, they develop negative stereotypes by linking the labeled PLWHA with discrediting attributes (e.g. using drugs or being promiscuous). Third, they develop a group-level stereotype by assigning

Authors: Ren, Chunbo., Hust, Stacey., Zhang, Peng. and Zhao, Yunze.
first   previous   Page 7 of 23   next   last



background image
HIV STIMGATIZATION AND STEROTYPING                                                                     7
 
 
HIV Stigmatization and Stereotyping 
Stereotypes are traits or simplified mental pictures that we form when we think about a 
particular social group (Lippmann, 1922; Dovidio, 1999). Accordingly, stereotyping is a 
process by which people use social categories in recalling and processing information about 
others (Dovidio, 1999).  Stereotyping is considered an unjustified and inaccurate process due to 
overgeneralization (Brigham, 1971). Stereotyping and stigmatization are highly related 
processes in most cases (Biernat & Dovidio, 2000). Stereotyping influences how people think 
about others (heuristic cue to recall) and feel about others (negative attitudes and prejudice). 
Stereotypes can also exert influence on people’s discriminatory behavior (Dovidio et al., 1996).  
Stereotyping is highly integrated into HIV/AIDS stigmatization. They both involve the 
recognition of a “mark” that signifies group membership from the perceiver’s perspective 
(Biernat & Dovidio, 2000).  Furthermore, stigma is associated with a stereotype when 
responsibility attribution is salient. To the extent that people are viewed as responsible for their 
stigma, a negative stereotype is likely to develop toward the particular social group (Biernat & 
Dovidio, 2000).  With responsibility attribution, stereotyping can play a central role in the 
development, justification, enhancement and consolidation of stigmatization (Biernat & 
Dovidio, 2000). 
The conceptualization of stigma proposed by Link and Phelan (2001) well explains the 
association and integration of group stereotyping and HIV stigmatization. In their 
conceptualization, stigma includes a label and a stereotype. First, people differentiate PLWHA 
and label them as different from the norm (e.g. AIDS girl, AIDS mother). Second, they develop 
negative stereotypes by linking the labeled PLWHA with discrediting attributes (e.g. using 
drugs or being promiscuous). Third, they develop a group-level stereotype by assigning 


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 7 of 23   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.