Citation

Who Are Others in The Third-Person Effect? : A selective downward comparison of non-smokers and smokers toward smoking issues

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Concerning the third-person effect, the purpose of this paper is to answer the fundamental question ‘who are others?’ when assessing the perceived effects of cigarette and anti-tobacco advertising. The particular interest of this study is to investigate the underlying mechanism of the third-person effect between non-smokers and smokers by applying the social comparison theory and downward comparison theory. Findings indicated that, when downward comparison is not available, people are inclined to compare themselves with similar others in order to defend their self-esteem when assessing the effects of cigarette messages and anti-tobacco messages on themselves as well as on others. Conversely, once downward comparison is applicable, people prefer to compare themselves with dissimilar others for self-enhancement. Consequently, the different choices in reference group between non-smokers and smokers result in the changes in the sign or magnitude of the perceived effects toward both cigarette and anti-tobacco advertising.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

effect (195), person (178), other (177), third (136), smoker (121), third-person (120), self (96), social (79), advertis (78), comparison (71), peopl (66), perceiv (65), tobacco (63), smoke (63), cigarett (62), anti (60), 2 (59), p (56), anti-tobacco (49), particip (47), non (46),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520548_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Kim, Keun Yeong. and Jin, Hyun Seung. "Who Are Others in The Third-Person Effect? : A selective downward comparison of non-smokers and smokers toward smoking issues" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520548_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kim, K. and Jin, H. , 2011-08-10 "Who Are Others in The Third-Person Effect? : A selective downward comparison of non-smokers and smokers toward smoking issues" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520548_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Concerning the third-person effect, the purpose of this paper is to answer the fundamental question ‘who are others?’ when assessing the perceived effects of cigarette and anti-tobacco advertising. The particular interest of this study is to investigate the underlying mechanism of the third-person effect between non-smokers and smokers by applying the social comparison theory and downward comparison theory. Findings indicated that, when downward comparison is not available, people are inclined to compare themselves with similar others in order to defend their self-esteem when assessing the effects of cigarette messages and anti-tobacco messages on themselves as well as on others. Conversely, once downward comparison is applicable, people prefer to compare themselves with dissimilar others for self-enhancement. Consequently, the different choices in reference group between non-smokers and smokers result in the changes in the sign or magnitude of the perceived effects toward both cigarette and anti-tobacco advertising.


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