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Measuring, Classifying and Predicting Prosumption Behavior in Social Media
Unformatted Document Text:  Social Media Prosumption     5    Media content is an intellectual product in which the first copy production cost is high but reproduction cost is low to none (Hoskins, McFadyen & Finn 2004; Shapiro & Varian 1999). The intellectual impact of media content is quite valuable and many times higher than its economic value to institutions and individuals in the society. The power of an intellectual product lies on its potential influence on the mind of the consumers by providing them with knowledge, persuading them on an issue position, or forming an opinion on a subject. Because of this potential, those who would like to create a social impact and exert ideological control will be eager to produce media content even the content itself may not be profitable. Hence it explains why many sites have free content provided to the public even if they don’t have a sustainable business model (Ha 2003). Cross-subsidy by a corporation or non-profit organization is very common as shown in a study of webcasting practices around the world (Ha 2007). Despite the possibility of a dual role of being both a producer and a consumer in social media, we argue that many will not take this possibility due to disparity in production and content resources. The interest in producing content varies by consumers. Moreover, the production of content is not free. Apart from the labor of assembling the content, certain media require more production resources than others. For example, a video product review requires much more production resources than a text review and certain content sites (e.g., Wikipedia) require more knowledge expertise than others. Also, people have different motivations to share or contribute (Mendelson & Papacharissi 2010). Many previous research documented the unwillingness of people to share information on the Internet due to privacy concerns (Chun and Lee 2010; Preece, Nonnecke & Andrews 2004), gaps in Internet skills and resources (Hargittai, 2002; van Dijk 2004), and many other reasons.

Authors: Ha, Louisa. and Yun, Gi Woong.
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Social Media Prosumption
 
 
 
Media content is an intellectual product in which the first copy production cost is high 
but reproduction cost is low to none (Hoskins, McFadyen & Finn 2004; Shapiro & Varian 1999). 
The intellectual impact of media content is quite valuable and many times higher than its 
economic value to institutions and individuals in the society.  The power of an intellectual 
product lies on its potential influence on the mind of the consumers by providing them with 
knowledge, persuading them on an issue position, or forming an opinion on a subject. Because of 
this potential, those who would like to create a social impact and exert ideological control will be 
eager to produce media content even the content itself may not be profitable.  Hence it explains 
why many sites have free content provided to the public even if they don’t have a sustainable 
business model (Ha 2003). Cross-subsidy by a corporation or non-profit organization is very 
common as shown in a study of webcasting practices around the world (Ha 2007). 
Despite the possibility of a dual role of being both a producer and a consumer in social 
media, we argue that many will not take this possibility due to disparity in production and 
content resources. The interest in producing content varies by consumers. Moreover, the 
production of content is not free.  Apart from the labor of assembling the content, certain media 
require more production resources than others.  For example, a video product review requires 
much more production resources than a text review and certain content sites (e.g., Wikipedia) 
require more knowledge expertise than others. Also, people have different motivations to share 
or contribute (Mendelson & Papacharissi 2010).  Many previous research documented the 
unwillingness of people to share information on the Internet due to privacy concerns (Chun and 
Lee 2010; Preece, Nonnecke & Andrews 2004), gaps in Internet skills and resources (Hargittai, 
2002; van Dijk 2004), and many other reasons. 


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