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Measuring, Classifying and Predicting Prosumption Behavior in Social Media
Unformatted Document Text:  Social Media Prosumption     9    Professional Amateurs by other researchers such as Leadbeater & Miller (2004). They are heavy users of the medium and produce frequently for the content for the sites. Based on Abercromie and Longhurst’s (1998) research, Enthusiasts/Dedicated Prosumers are the fans and enthusiasts, skilled audiences who are self-organized with higher level of media competencies. Some of the prosumers belong to the narcissists who are interested in performing to the public as described by Lasch (1978) and Keshaw (1998). But others may have a good cause such as advocates for non-profit groups or political activists who utilize the social media to garner support and educate the public on an issue. The second group is the high production, low consumption prosumer. We labeled them as Contributors. These people are primarily interested in performing to others, but not interested in watching others’ work. Their utility value to the user-generated content site is the content they provide, not the time they consume the websites. Hence they are of low value to advertisers. These contributors are taking advantage of the massive reach and public good nature of the social media sites to get their point across. The third group is the low production, but high consumption prosumers. Previous studies on consumer engagement called them Lurkers or Passive Audience (Preece, Nonnecke & Andrews 2004). We labeled them as Spectators because they pay attention and spend lots of time on social media and user-generated websites. But, they just don’t want to contribute or share with others. Spectators sometimes are lack of skills and/or resources to contribute content. These spectators do not produce, but by their mere heavy consumption of the social media sites, they support the network externalities which maximize the economic and communication impact of these sites (Katz & Shapiro 1985). They are the audience base that is important to sustain any

Authors: Ha, Louisa. and Yun, Gi Woong.
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Social Media Prosumption
 
 
 
Professional Amateurs by other researchers such as Leadbeater & Miller (2004).  They are heavy 
users of the medium and produce frequently for the content for the sites.  Based on Abercromie 
and Longhurst’s (1998) research, Enthusiasts/Dedicated Prosumers are the fans and enthusiasts, 
skilled audiences who are self-organized with higher level of media competencies.  Some of the 
prosumers belong to the narcissists who are interested in performing to the public as described 
by Lasch (1978) and Keshaw (1998).  But others may have a good cause such as advocates for 
non-profit groups or political activists who utilize the social media to garner support and educate 
the public on an issue.  
The second group is the high production, low consumption prosumer. We labeled them as 
Contributors. These people are primarily interested in performing to others, but not interested in 
watching others’ work. Their utility value to the user-generated content site is the content they 
provide, not the time they consume the websites. Hence they are of low value to advertisers.  
These contributors are taking advantage of the massive reach and public good nature of the 
social media sites to get their point across. 
The third group is the low production, but high consumption prosumers.  Previous studies 
on consumer engagement called them Lurkers or Passive Audience (Preece, Nonnecke & 
Andrews 2004). We labeled them as Spectators because they pay attention and spend lots of time 
on social media and user-generated websites. But, they just don’t want to contribute or share 
with others. Spectators sometimes are lack of skills and/or resources to contribute content. These 
spectators do not produce, but by their mere heavy consumption of the social media sites, they 
support the network externalities which maximize the economic and communication impact of 
these sites (Katz & Shapiro 1985). They are the audience base that is important to sustain any 


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