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Perceived Credibility of Mainstream Newspapers and Facebook

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Abstract:

This study examines whether consumers perceived differences in the credibility of news from a mainstream newspaper compared to a social media web site where a friend provides a link to a story. Measures indicated significant differences across four indices, with a New York Times story rated higher in terms of professionalism, authority, and information, while participants indicated they were more likely to provide a link to the friend’s Facebook story on their own Facebook page.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

credibl (116), news (111), stori (102), facebook (89), newspap (72), 1 (57), 2 (50), sourc (47), friend (44), 7 (40), 3 (40), particip (38), 4 (36), found (35), time (35), new (35), perceiv (34), 6 (34), site (34), 48 (33), link (32),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520713_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Nynka, Andrew. and McCaffrey, Raymond. "Perceived Credibility of Mainstream Newspapers and Facebook" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520713_index.html>

APA Citation:

Nynka, A. and McCaffrey, R. , 2011-08-10 "Perceived Credibility of Mainstream Newspapers and Facebook" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520713_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines whether consumers perceived differences in the credibility of news from a mainstream newspaper compared to a social media web site where a friend provides a link to a story. Measures indicated significant differences across four indices, with a New York Times story rated higher in terms of professionalism, authority, and information, while participants indicated they were more likely to provide a link to the friend’s Facebook story on their own Facebook page.


Similar Titles:
Equal Trust: An Experiment Exploring the Impact of Interactivity and Sources on Individuals' Perceptions of Credibility for Online News Stories

HOW INTERPERSONAL TRUST MANIFESTS ONLINE BEHAVIOR: A case study exploring the impact of societal levels of interpersonal trust on the utilization of online source credible information.

A Floor Analysis of Online News Discussion on Facebook and the New York Times Website

How Perceived Information Quality of Online News Sources Determines Political Knowledge Through Self-Efficacy


 
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