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Flying Dragon Seeking Freedom of Information: A Critique of Chinese OGI Regulations

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Abstract:

In 2008, four decades after U.S. Congress passed the Freedom of Information Act, People’s Republic of China embraced its own concept of freedom of information. This paper examined Chinese freedom of information law known as the Open Government Information Regulations (OGI Regulations) and found that the Chinese law is embracing international standards in many areas but also have something unique. The paper examined the major flaws of the law and also examined many court cases to see how the law has been implemented.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

govern (222), inform (193), china (132), ogi (131), regul (110), law (101), chines (99), 03/31/2011 (95), visit (95), request (82), last (79), open (62), agenc (60), administr (46), freedom (46), case (45), peopl (42), public (36), retriev (35), 2008 (34), shanghai (31),
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Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
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http://www.aejmc.org


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MLA Citation:

Tang, Yong. and Martin, Halstuk. "Flying Dragon Seeking Freedom of Information: A Critique of Chinese OGI Regulations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520728_index.html>

APA Citation:

Tang, Y. and Martin, H. , 2011-08-10 "Flying Dragon Seeking Freedom of Information: A Critique of Chinese OGI Regulations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520728_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 2008, four decades after U.S. Congress passed the Freedom of Information Act, People’s Republic of China embraced its own concept of freedom of information. This paper examined Chinese freedom of information law known as the Open Government Information Regulations (OGI Regulations) and found that the Chinese law is embracing international standards in many areas but also have something unique. The paper examined the major flaws of the law and also examined many court cases to see how the law has been implemented.


Similar Titles:
An Active Role of Government for the Public’s Right to Know: A Case Study of the Government Information Disclosure Policy in South Korea

From Private Policing to Administrative Regulation: The Shift from Regulation without Bureaucracies to Centralized Agencies in the United States, 1890-1930

The Politics of the Governing the Information and Communications Technologies in the One-Party States: Case Studies of China and Singapore


 
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