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Flying Dragon Seeking Freedom of Information: A Critique of Chinese OGI Regulations
Unformatted Document Text:  g overnment’s belief in democratic values. China’s entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO) in December 2001 required the country to make its trade- related rules and requirements transparent. The WTO requirements ―added impetus to the movement toward [g overnment] openness.‖ 30 Competition for the International Summer Olympic Games is also a factor. The national OGI Regulations became effective on May 1, 2008, just three months before the Olympics were held in Beijing. For China to be selected to host the Olympics, an event long hoped for by Chinese people, the Chinese government needed to become more transparent so that it could present a more favorable international image. The main motivations underlying the OGI Regulations, however, are largely domestic. As Yale University China scholar Jamie P. Horsley put it, OGI Regulations are for ―broader sharing of government information in the service of economic development; enhancing trust of the government; curbing government corruption; and promoting better governance.‖ 31 It took China many years to make this progress. In fact, for nearly two decades Chinese leaders had sought to move toward greater government transparency. 32 Chinese leaders had long thought to move forward on greater 30 Hanhua Zhou, Open Government in China: Practice and Problems, in A NN F LORINI and J OSEPH E. S TIGLITZ , eds., T HE R IGHT TO K NOW : T RANSPARENCY FOR AN O PEN W ORLD 61(2007). 31 Jamie P. Horsley, China Adopts First Nationwide Open Government Information Regulations. Retrieved at: < http://www.law.yale.edu/documents/pdf/Intellectual_Life/CL-OGI- China_Adopts_JPH-English.pdf >. (last visited 03/31/2011). 32 Hanhua Zhou, Open Government in China: Practice and Problems, in A NN F LORINI and J OSEPH E. S TIGLITZ , eds., T HE R IGHT TO K NOW : T RANSPARENCY FOR AN

Authors: Tang, Yong. and Martin, Halstuk.
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background image
 
 
g
overnment’s belief in 
democratic values. 
China’s entry into the World Trade 
Organization (WTO) in December 2001 required the country to make its trade-
related rules and requirements transparent. The WTO requirements ―added 
impetus to the movement toward [g
overnment] openness.‖
30
 Competition for the 
International Summer Olympic Games is also a factor. The national OGI 
Regulations became effective on May 1, 2008, just three months before the 
Olympics were held in Beijing. For China to be selected to host the Olympics, an 
event long hoped for by Chinese people, the Chinese government needed to 
become more transparent so that it could present a more favorable international 
image. The main motivations underlying the OGI Regulations, however, are 
largely domestic. As Yale University China scholar Jamie P. Horsley put it, OGI 
Regulations are for ―broader sharing of government information in the service of 
economic development; enhancing trust of the government; curbing government 
corruption; and promoting better governance.‖
31
 
It took China many years to make this progress. In fact, for nearly two 
decades Chinese leaders had sought to move toward greater government 
transparency.
32
 Chinese leaders had long thought to move forward on greater 
                                                      
30
 Hanhua Zhou, Open Government in China: Practice and Problems, in A
NN 
F
LORINI
 and
 
J
OSEPH 
E.
 
S
TIGLITZ
, eds., T
HE 
R
IGHT TO 
K
NOW
:
 
T
RANSPARENCY FOR AN 
O
PEN 
W
ORLD
 61(2007). 
 
31
 Jamie P. Horsley, China Adopts First Nationwide Open Government 
Information Regulations. Retrieved at: 
<
>. (last visited 03/31/2011).  
 
32
 
Hanhua Zhou, Open Government in China: Practice and Problems, in A
NN 
F
LORINI 
and J
OSEPH 
E.
 
S
TIGLITZ
, eds., T
HE 
R
IGHT TO 
K
NOW
:
 
T
RANSPARENCY FOR AN 


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