All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

#Forward!: Twitter as Citizen Journalism in the Wisconsin Labor Protests
Unformatted Document Text:  Twitter
and
the
Wisconsin
Labor
Protests

 
 24
 shown
the
contribution
of
the
agenda‐setters
in
disseminating
news.
Traditionally,
 mainstream
media
are
seen
as
setting
the
agenda;
however,
our
findings
suggest
a
 role
for
social
media
in
setting
the
agenda
for
those
who
followed
the
story
via
 Twitter.
Those
users
who
might
have
otherwise
followed
the
story
in
Madison’s
 local
media
would
have
received
information
from
a
much
wider
range
of
sources
 from
Twitter,
including
citizen
journalism
and
non‐news
sources.
 The
two‐step
flow
model
and
the
role
of
opinion
leaders
in
mass
 communication
have
also
been
signified
by
this
study.
It
can
be
inferred
from
the
 findings
of
the
study
that
Twitter
users
were
informed
about
the
protest
by
tweets.
 Moreover,
a
small
minority
of
users
acted
as
opinion
leaders
about
the
issue
to
 those
people
who
were
less
active
in
Twitter
participation.
The
results
show
that
a
 few
users
–
approximately
10
percent
–
made
78.7
percent
of
the
tweets.
 This
study
additionally
demonstrates
usage
of
Twitter
for
citizen
journalism
 purposes,
as
new
media
are
frequently
seen
to
do
(Bowman
&
Willis,
2003;
Schaffer,
 2007).
We
find
evidence
that
Twitter
enabled
the
spread
of
news
information
across
 physical
spaces
and
provided
a
standardized
platform
for
the
contextualization
of
 that
information.
Additionally,
our
findings
suggest
changing
behavior
over
time,
 from
a
reliance
on
redistributing
information
to
a
greater
prevalence
of
new
 information
being
disseminated
in
tweets.
 There
are
several
key
limitations
to
this
study.
First,
this
paper
uses
a
case
 study
methodology
to
understand
the
nature
and
extent
of
communication
 facilitated
by
Twitter
during
a
23‐day
period
that
was
marked
by
labor
protests
in
 Wisconsin.
This
allows
us
a
close
understanding
of
this
one
case,
but
has
a


Authors: Veenstra, Aaron., Iyer, Narayanan., Bansal, Namrata., Hossain, Mohammad., Park, Jiwoo. and Hong, Jiachun.
first   previous   Page 25 of 33   next   last



background image
Twitter
and
the
Wisconsin
Labor
Protests


24

shown
the
contribution
of
the
agenda‐setters
in
disseminating
news.
Traditionally,

mainstream
media
are
seen
as
setting
the
agenda;
however,
our
findings
suggest
a

role
for
social
media
in
setting
the
agenda
for
those
who
followed
the
story
via

Twitter.
Those
users
who
might
have
otherwise
followed
the
story
in
Madison’s

local
media
would
have
received
information
from
a
much
wider
range
of
sources

from
Twitter,
including
citizen
journalism
and
non‐news
sources.

The
two‐step
flow
model
and
the
role
of
opinion
leaders
in
mass

communication
have
also
been
signified
by
this
study.
It
can
be
inferred
from
the

findings
of
the
study
that
Twitter
users
were
informed
about
the
protest
by
tweets.

Moreover,
a
small
minority
of
users
acted
as
opinion
leaders
about
the
issue
to

those
people
who
were
less
active
in
Twitter
participation.
The
results
show
that
a

few
users
–
approximately
10
percent
–
made
78.7
percent
of
the
tweets.

This
study
additionally
demonstrates
usage
of
Twitter
for
citizen
journalism

purposes,
as
new
media
are
frequently
seen
to
do
(Bowman
&
Willis,
2003;
Schaffer,

2007).
We
find
evidence
that
Twitter
enabled
the
spread
of
news
information
across

physical
spaces
and
provided
a
standardized
platform
for
the
contextualization
of

that
information.
Additionally,
our
findings
suggest
changing
behavior
over
time,

from
a
reliance
on
redistributing
information
to
a
greater
prevalence
of
new

information
being
disseminated
in
tweets.

There
are
several
key
limitations
to
this
study.
First,
this
paper
uses
a
case

study
methodology
to
understand
the
nature
and
extent
of
communication

facilitated
by
Twitter
during
a
23‐day
period
that
was
marked
by
labor
protests
in

Wisconsin.
This
allows
us
a
close
understanding
of
this
one
case,
but
has
a



Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 25 of 33   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.