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#Forward!: Twitter as Citizen Journalism in the Wisconsin Labor Protests
Unformatted Document Text:  Twitter
and
the
Wisconsin
Labor
Protests

 
 26
 period
lasted
only
three
weeks.
Given
the
changes
observed
in
linking
behavior
over
 time,
we
might
have
seen
different
outcomes
over
a
longer
period
of
time.
 This
study
opens
doors
for
many
possible
future
studies
on
Twitter
and
 social
movements.
More
in‐depth
coding
of
tweet
contents
could
help
us
understand
 what
kind
of
information
and
opinions
are
more
likely
getting
retweeted
than
 others
in
a
social
movement.
Further
coding
of
the
URLs,
especially
the
social
 network
links
and
picture/video
links,
could
provide
insights
about
what
kinds
of
 information
are
being
sent
out
from
ongoing
events
and
additionally
illuminate
the
 role
of
new
mobile
technologies,
e.g.,
smartphone
cameras.
 In
addition,
interviews
with
Twitter
users
can
help
us
understand
their
 intentions
and
motivations
in
distributing
and
redistributing
news
through
social
 media.
Specifically,
interviews
with
Wisconsin
protesters
on
their
use
of
Twitter
 could
provide
clarity
to
some
of
our
lingering
questions
regarding
the
use
of
mobile
 phones.
Using
user
or
post
as
the
unit
of
analysis
is
a
widely
debated
methodological
 issue
in
new
media
study.
Although
an
analysis
of
posts,
either
original
ones
or
 retweets,
could
quantify
the
communication
pathway
and
establish
analytic
models,
 qualitative
interviews,
with
its
"rediscovery
of
man"
in
an
online
environment,
are
 able
to
generate
more
vivid
knowledge
about
real
Twitter
usage
in
a
protest
context.
 It
would
be
useful
to
identify
opinion
leaders
in
this
network
and
investigate
how
 they
disseminate
information
to
others
both
in
and
outside
of
the
protests.
 Another
angle
on
the
questions
presented
in
this
case
study
could
involve
 moving
the
focus
from
social
media
to
news
coverage
in
traditional
media.
It
will
be
 interesting
to
note
how
news
on
Twitter
influences
the
news
in
traditional
media


Authors: Veenstra, Aaron., Iyer, Narayanan., Bansal, Namrata., Hossain, Mohammad., Park, Jiwoo. and Hong, Jiachun.
first   previous   Page 27 of 33   next   last



background image
Twitter
and
the
Wisconsin
Labor
Protests


26

period
lasted
only
three
weeks.
Given
the
changes
observed
in
linking
behavior
over

time,
we
might
have
seen
different
outcomes
over
a
longer
period
of
time.

This
study
opens
doors
for
many
possible
future
studies
on
Twitter
and

social
movements.
More
in‐depth
coding
of
tweet
contents
could
help
us
understand

what
kind
of
information
and
opinions
are
more
likely
getting
retweeted
than

others
in
a
social
movement.
Further
coding
of
the
URLs,
especially
the
social

network
links
and
picture/video
links,
could
provide
insights
about
what
kinds
of

information
are
being
sent
out
from
ongoing
events
and
additionally
illuminate
the

role
of
new
mobile
technologies,
e.g.,
smartphone
cameras.

In
addition,
interviews
with
Twitter
users
can
help
us
understand
their

intentions
and
motivations
in
distributing
and
redistributing
news
through
social

media.
Specifically,
interviews
with
Wisconsin
protesters
on
their
use
of
Twitter

could
provide
clarity
to
some
of
our
lingering
questions
regarding
the
use
of
mobile

phones.
Using
user
or
post
as
the
unit
of
analysis
is
a
widely
debated
methodological

issue
in
new
media
study.
Although
an
analysis
of
posts,
either
original
ones
or

retweets,
could
quantify
the
communication
pathway
and
establish
analytic
models,

qualitative
interviews,
with
its
"rediscovery
of
man"
in
an
online
environment,
are

able
to
generate
more
vivid
knowledge
about
real
Twitter
usage
in
a
protest
context.

It
would
be
useful
to
identify
opinion
leaders
in
this
network
and
investigate
how

they
disseminate
information
to
others
both
in
and
outside
of
the
protests.

Another
angle
on
the
questions
presented
in
this
case
study
could
involve

moving
the
focus
from
social
media
to
news
coverage
in
traditional
media.
It
will
be

interesting
to
note
how
news
on
Twitter
influences
the
news
in
traditional
media



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