All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

#Forward!: Twitter as Citizen Journalism in the Wisconsin Labor Protests
Unformatted Document Text:  Twitter
and
the
Wisconsin
Labor
Protests

 
 3
 In
this
case
study,
we
focus
on
the
use
of
Twitter
in
the
early
days
of
the
 Wisconsin
protests,
specifically
examining
its
uses
as
an
alternative
news
source
 and
distribution
channel
to
the
traditional
media
both
in
and
outside
of
Madison,
 WI.
This
is
potentially
a
highly
important
role
for
Twitter
as
a
medium,
because
it
 allows
people
to
both
relay
news
they’ve
encountered
elsewhere
and
to
provide
 reports
from
ongoing
events
at
which
they
are
present.
The
mobile
nature
of
the
 platform
raises
key
questions
about
the
production
of
news
information
in
the
new
 media
era
by
presenting
a
venue
in
which
citizen
journalists
can
route
around
not
 only
the
traditional
institutions
and
production
processes
of
news,
but
also
the
 established
forms
of
organizational
citizen
journalism.
To
study
it
in
the
Wisconsin
 context,
we
first
present
a
brief
history
of
the
protests
themselves,
and
then
 examine
existing
theory
regarding
the
production
of
news,
citizen
journalism
and
 the
use
of
mobile
computing
in
information
diffusion.
 The
2011
Wisconsin
labor
protests.
On
February
11,
2011,
Governor
Scott
 Walker
announced
his
intention
to
strip
about
175,000
public
employees
of
their
 collective
bargaining
rights
(Spicuzza
&
Barbour,
2011).
Though
Walker
expected
 the
so‐called
“budget
repair
bill”
to
be
passed
within
a
week
of
the
announcement
 (Bauer,
2011),
public
employee
unions
quickly
mobilized
in
opposition
to
it.
On
 February
14,
public
employee
unions,
University
of
Wisconsin‐Madison
students
 and
others
staged
the
first
of
many
rallies
at
the
Wisconsin
Capitol
building
in
 downtown
Madison
(Kalk
Derby,
2011),
leading
into
a
period
of
semi‐permanent
 protest
both
within
and
around
the
building.
On
February
17,
Democratic
members


Authors: Veenstra, Aaron., Iyer, Narayanan., Bansal, Namrata., Hossain, Mohammad., Park, Jiwoo. and Hong, Jiachun.
first   previous   Page 4 of 33   next   last



background image
Twitter
and
the
Wisconsin
Labor
Protests


3

In
this
case
study,
we
focus
on
the
use
of
Twitter
in
the
early
days
of
the

Wisconsin
protests,
specifically
examining
its
uses
as
an
alternative
news
source

and
distribution
channel
to
the
traditional
media
both
in
and
outside
of
Madison,

WI.
This
is
potentially
a
highly
important
role
for
Twitter
as
a
medium,
because
it

allows
people
to
both
relay
news
they’ve
encountered
elsewhere
and
to
provide

reports
from
ongoing
events
at
which
they
are
present.
The
mobile
nature
of
the

platform
raises
key
questions
about
the
production
of
news
information
in
the
new

media
era
by
presenting
a
venue
in
which
citizen
journalists
can
route
around
not

only
the
traditional
institutions
and
production
processes
of
news,
but
also
the

established
forms
of
organizational
citizen
journalism.
To
study
it
in
the
Wisconsin

context,
we
first
present
a
brief
history
of
the
protests
themselves,
and
then

examine
existing
theory
regarding
the
production
of
news,
citizen
journalism
and

the
use
of
mobile
computing
in
information
diffusion.

The
2011
Wisconsin
labor
protests.
On
February
11,
2011,
Governor
Scott

Walker
announced
his
intention
to
strip
about
175,000
public
employees
of
their

collective
bargaining
rights
(Spicuzza
&
Barbour,
2011).
Though
Walker
expected

the
so‐called
“budget
repair
bill”
to
be
passed
within
a
week
of
the
announcement

(Bauer,
2011),
public
employee
unions
quickly
mobilized
in
opposition
to
it.
On

February
14,
public
employee
unions,
University
of
Wisconsin‐Madison
students

and
others
staged
the
first
of
many
rallies
at
the
Wisconsin
Capitol
building
in

downtown
Madison
(Kalk
Derby,
2011),
leading
into
a
period
of
semi‐permanent

protest
both
within
and
around
the
building.
On
February
17,
Democratic
members



Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 33   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.