All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

#Forward!: Twitter as Citizen Journalism in the Wisconsin Labor Protests
Unformatted Document Text:  Twitter
and
the
Wisconsin
Labor
Protests

 
 8
 and
engagement
with
the
entire
process
of
gathering,
reporting
and
producing
news
 information
(Bowman
&
Willis,
2003).
 The
emergence
of
various
forms
of
citizen
journalism
has
enabled
the
public
 to
perform
“an
active
role
in
the
process
of
collecting,
reporting,
analyzing
and
 disseminating
news
and
information”
(Bowman
&
Willis,
2003,
p.
2).
Sometimes
 called
“participatory
journalism,”
“grassroots
journalism”
or
“public
journalism,”
the
 concept
of
citizen
journalism
has
built
momentum
over
the
past
few
years,
spurred
 by
new
developments
in
Internet
technology
(Niekamp,
2009).
Witt
(2004)
 appraises
the
shifting
media
landscape
in
the
Internet
age
and
articulates,
“New
 tools
and
the
sheer
volume
of
public
interaction
on
the
Internet
indicate
that
all
 media
are
facing
a
sea
change,
which
will
especially
affect
how
the
various
media
 interact
with
their
audiences”
(p.
1).
 It
has
been
commonly
argued
that
the
citizen
journalism
“movement”
began
 in
the
U.S.
during
the
1988
presidential
campaign
(Dvorkin,
2001;
Meyer,
1995).
 During
that
campaign,
sections
of
the
American
public
were
dissatisfied
about
 irrelevant
media
reporting
of
the
issues
and
disillusioned
with
traditional
coverage
 of
mainstream
politics.
This
bland
reporting
encouraged
some
citizens
to
take
the
 matter
in
their
own
hands.
As
a
mobilized
response,
groups
of
citizens
began
 creating
and
distributing
their
own
versions
of
the
issues
and
events
in
various
 formats
(Mythen,
2010).
Lemert,
Mitzman,
Seither,
Cook
and
O'Neil
(1977)
defined
 mobilizing
information
as
any
information
that
allows
people
to
act
on
attitudes
 they
already
possess.
A
study
by
Carpenter
(2008b)
assessed
the
use
of
three
types
 of
mobilizing
information
(locational,
identificational,
tactical)
by
online
citizen
and


Authors: Veenstra, Aaron., Iyer, Narayanan., Bansal, Namrata., Hossain, Mohammad., Park, Jiwoo. and Hong, Jiachun.
first   previous   Page 9 of 33   next   last



background image
Twitter
and
the
Wisconsin
Labor
Protests


8

and
engagement
with
the
entire
process
of
gathering,
reporting
and
producing
news

information
(Bowman
&
Willis,
2003).

The
emergence
of
various
forms
of
citizen
journalism
has
enabled
the
public

to
perform
“an
active
role
in
the
process
of
collecting,
reporting,
analyzing
and

disseminating
news
and
information”
(Bowman
&
Willis,
2003,
p.
2).
Sometimes

called
“participatory
journalism,”
“grassroots
journalism”
or
“public
journalism,”
the

concept
of
citizen
journalism
has
built
momentum
over
the
past
few
years,
spurred

by
new
developments
in
Internet
technology
(Niekamp,
2009).
Witt
(2004)

appraises
the
shifting
media
landscape
in
the
Internet
age
and
articulates,
“New

tools
and
the
sheer
volume
of
public
interaction
on
the
Internet
indicate
that
all

media
are
facing
a
sea
change,
which
will
especially
affect
how
the
various
media

interact
with
their
audiences”
(p.
1).

It
has
been
commonly
argued
that
the
citizen
journalism
“movement”
began

in
the
U.S.
during
the
1988
presidential
campaign
(Dvorkin,
2001;
Meyer,
1995).

During
that
campaign,
sections
of
the
American
public
were
dissatisfied
about

irrelevant
media
reporting
of
the
issues
and
disillusioned
with
traditional
coverage

of
mainstream
politics.
This
bland
reporting
encouraged
some
citizens
to
take
the

matter
in
their
own
hands.
As
a
mobilized
response,
groups
of
citizens
began

creating
and
distributing
their
own
versions
of
the
issues
and
events
in
various

formats
(Mythen,
2010).
Lemert,
Mitzman,
Seither,
Cook
and
O'Neil
(1977)
defined

mobilizing
information
as
any
information
that
allows
people
to
act
on
attitudes

they
already
possess.
A
study
by
Carpenter
(2008b)
assessed
the
use
of
three
types

of
mobilizing
information
(locational,
identificational,
tactical)
by
online
citizen
and



Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 9 of 33   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.