All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Matter of Life and Death? Examining the Quality of Newspaper Coverage on the Newspaper Crisis
Unformatted Document Text:  17! quoted, 13 causes of the crisis, 14 impression of optimism/pessimism about the state of newspapers, 15 and the use of death-related imagery. 16 Two trained coders, journalism students at a public U.S. university, performed the content analysis after a training session. To ensure inter-coder reliability, two rounds of pretests were conducted until the inter-coder agreement on all key variables reached 80% or higher. 17 Data Analysis Because this sample includes three major newspapers with rather different orientations and audiences—a rather unusual occurrence in content analyses—this study intended to examine whether these newspapers emphasized different aspects when covering the newspaper crisis. Because the eventual sample included only two articles from USA Today, chi-square and t-test analyses compare the differences between the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times only. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! shrinking audiences of other media, such as broadcast TV, (5) the recession’s impact in other industries, and (6) newspaper consumption trends in countries other than the U.S. 13 Coding categories for “sources quoted” were: (1) corporate newspapers/publishers, (2) journalists/editors, (3) research reports, 13 (4) financial analysts, (5) scholars/media critics, (6) bloggers, (7) readers, and (8) other. 14 The cause(s) of the crisis was coded on the following categories: (1) corporate debts and ownership, (2) loss of advertising revenue, (3) economy/recession, (4) the Internet (including online news aggregators like Google or blogs), (5) readers (circulation declines, migration to other media, lack of interest in news, etc.), and (6) newspapers themselves (e.g., lack of innovations, ignoring readers’ needs, etc.). 15 Coders were asked to judge whether the story likely would make a reader feel “pessimistic” or “optimistic” about the state of the newspaper. 16 The tone of the coverage was assessed by noting the use of “death imagery” in the story—i.e., whether journalists used words such as “death,” “perish,” “die,” “dying,” “kill,” etc.—when referring to the state of the print newspaper. 17 Inter-coder reliability was calculated as the number of agreements divided by the total number of measures (Neuendorf, 2001, p. 149).

Authors: Chyi, H. Iris., Lewis, Seth. and Zheng, Nan.
first   previous   Page 18 of 34   next   last



background image
17!
 
quoted,
13
 causes of the crisis,
14
 impression of optimism/pessimism about the state of 
newspapers,
15
 and the use of death-related imagery.
16
 
Two trained coders, journalism students at a public U.S. university, performed 
the content analysis after a training session. To ensure inter-coder reliability, two 
rounds of pretests were conducted until the inter-coder agreement on all key variables 
reached 80% or higher.
17
 
Data Analysis 
Because this sample includes three major newspapers with rather different 
orientations and audiences—a rather unusual occurrence in content analyses—this 
study intended to examine whether these newspapers emphasized different aspects 
when covering the newspaper crisis. Because the eventual sample included only two 
articles from USA Todaychi-square and t-test analyses compare the differences 
between the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times only. 
 
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
shrinking audiences of other media, such as broadcast TV, (5) the recession’s impact in other 
industries, and (6) newspaper consumption trends in countries other than the U.S. 
13
 Coding categories for “sources quoted” were: (1) corporate newspapers/publishers, (2) 
journalists/editors, (3) research reports,
13
 (4) financial analysts, (5) scholars/media critics, (6) bloggers, 
(7) readers, and (8) other. 
14
 The cause(s) of the crisis was coded on the following categories: (1) corporate debts and ownership, 
(2) loss of advertising revenue, (3) economy/recession, (4) the Internet (including online news 
aggregators like Google or blogs), (5) readers (circulation declines, migration to other media, lack of 
interest in news, etc.), and (6) newspapers themselves (e.g., lack of innovations, ignoring readers’ 
needs, etc.). 
15
 Coders were asked to judge whether the story likely would make a reader feel “pessimistic” or 
“optimistic” about the state of the newspaper.  
16
 The tone of the coverage was assessed by noting the use of “death imagery” in the story—i.e., 
whether journalists used words such as “death,” “perish,” “die,” “dying,” “kill,” etc.—when referring 
to the state of the print newspaper.
 
17
 Inter-coder reliability was calculated as the number of agreements divided by the total number of 
measures (Neuendorf, 2001, p. 149). 


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 34   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.