Citation

Girlfriends & Sex and the City: an intersectional analysis of race, gender, & commodity feminism in two TV shows

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

In intersectional theory, gender and race have been referred to as super-ordinate groups. People think about themselves primarily in terms of membership in these groups and are likely to be categorized and stereotyped by others based on these affiliations. Discourse analysis was used to examine how these group identifications were emphasized in two television series, Sex and the City, about four white female friends, and Girlfriends, which follows four black women. Three discursive themes were found to connect the two shows: the Desperation Theme, or the race for marriage; the Networks of Care theme, or how the friends are there for each other; and the Consumption and Class theme, or the women's affluent lifestyle and its connection to issues of class. Despite these thematic connections, the themes were handled in ways that point to subtle differences between the groups of women and their views of the world

Most Common Document Word Stems:

black (119), women (92), girlfriend (75), sex (74), show (72), citi (67), american (45), gender (43), joan (40), white (39), one (38), race (36), cultur (35), class (33), femal (31), group (31), african (31), season (30), friend (30), singl (28), seri (28),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520938_index.html
Direct Link:
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MLA Citation:

kraeplin, camille. "Girlfriends & Sex and the City: an intersectional analysis of race, gender, & commodity feminism in two TV shows" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520938_index.html>

APA Citation:

kraeplin, c. , 2011-08-10 "Girlfriends & Sex and the City: an intersectional analysis of race, gender, & commodity feminism in two TV shows" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO Online <PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520938_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In intersectional theory, gender and race have been referred to as super-ordinate groups. People think about themselves primarily in terms of membership in these groups and are likely to be categorized and stereotyped by others based on these affiliations. Discourse analysis was used to examine how these group identifications were emphasized in two television series, Sex and the City, about four white female friends, and Girlfriends, which follows four black women. Three discursive themes were found to connect the two shows: the Desperation Theme, or the race for marriage; the Networks of Care theme, or how the friends are there for each other; and the Consumption and Class theme, or the women's affluent lifestyle and its connection to issues of class. Despite these thematic connections, the themes were handled in ways that point to subtle differences between the groups of women and their views of the world


Similar Titles:
Beyond Blackness: Intersectionality of African American Women: sociological approach to race, gender, and class

The Influence of Race, Gender, and Class on Working-Class African American Women's Entrepreneurship


 
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