Citation

News exposure, political knowledge, partisanship, and (mis)perceptions of change in conditions under George W. Bush

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This research uses 2008 ANES panel data to examine how partisanship, political knowledge, and news exposure contributed to citizens’ perceptions of how the economy, the federal deficit, poverty, and crime rates changed between 2001 and 2008 -- and to how those judgments changed as economic conditions worsened throughout the year. Partisanship was a robust predictor of perceptions: Democrats tended to see trends more negatively than did Republicans, regardless of the direction of the actual trends. Political knowledge and education tended to promote perceptions that were in the same direction as actual trends, but political knowledge interacted with party identification to promote partisan polarization in perceptions. Television news exposure unexpectedly emerged as the most important media variable, although its relationships with trend perceptions were not always in line with the facts. This was especially the case with crime, as cultivation research has suggested. As the year went on, partisans’ perceptions of economic trends appeared to be converging on a consensus that reflected reality. But this convergence may have been more the result of a floor effect among Democrats than anything else.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

percept (115), polit (108), trend (99), news (81), knowledg (75), 2008 (69), media (44), mispercept (42), 2001 (41), crime (41), mis (38), bush (38), strong (36), economi (36), republican (36), januari (35), parti (33), effect (30), rate (30), relat (30), partisan (28),
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520975_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Meirick, Patrick. "News exposure, political knowledge, partisanship, and (mis)perceptions of change in conditions under George W. Bush" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520975_index.html>

APA Citation:

Meirick, P. , 2011-08-10 "News exposure, political knowledge, partisanship, and (mis)perceptions of change in conditions under George W. Bush" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520975_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research uses 2008 ANES panel data to examine how partisanship, political knowledge, and news exposure contributed to citizens’ perceptions of how the economy, the federal deficit, poverty, and crime rates changed between 2001 and 2008 -- and to how those judgments changed as economic conditions worsened throughout the year. Partisanship was a robust predictor of perceptions: Democrats tended to see trends more negatively than did Republicans, regardless of the direction of the actual trends. Political knowledge and education tended to promote perceptions that were in the same direction as actual trends, but political knowledge interacted with party identification to promote partisan polarization in perceptions. Television news exposure unexpectedly emerged as the most important media variable, although its relationships with trend perceptions were not always in line with the facts. This was especially the case with crime, as cultivation research has suggested. As the year went on, partisans’ perceptions of economic trends appeared to be converging on a consensus that reflected reality. But this convergence may have been more the result of a floor effect among Democrats than anything else.


Similar Titles:
Revisiting the Contagious Cynicism Effect: How Game-Framed News and Perceptions of Partisan Bias Influence Media Trust

Intra-media Interaction: The Multiplicative Effects of News Media Use on Political Knowledge

The Effect of Press-Political Party Relationship on Framing: The Content Analysis of the Korean Media Tax Investigations in 1994 and 2001


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.